Jackie Watches Stuff

Jackie Watches the Star Wars Original Trilogy (part 2)

August 28, 2020 Jackie Vetrano / Jarrett Saia Season 1 Episode 9
Jackie Watches Stuff
Jackie Watches the Star Wars Original Trilogy (part 2)
Chapters
Jackie Watches Stuff
Jackie Watches the Star Wars Original Trilogy (part 2)
Aug 28, 2020 Season 1 Episode 9
Jackie Vetrano / Jarrett Saia

For our final episode of Season One, Jackie and Jarrett Saia complete their Jedi training and defeat the Empire!

Must know:

  • Jedi training requires a lot of upper body strength
  • Consent is cool
  • CGI ruined the original films

The "JACKIE WATCHES STUFF Fan Rendition of the Star Wars Theme" was written and composed by Sean Flynn, and performed by the JACKIE WATCHES STUFF House Band.

The JACKIE WATCHES STUFF House Band is:
Kazoo I: Sean Flynn
Kazoo II: Sean Flynn
Bass Kazoo I: Sean Flynn
Marimba: Sean Flynn
Half-moon tambourine: Sean Flynn
Maraca: Sean Flynn
LP Session Shaker: Sean Flynn

Follow us on Twitter @JackieWatches
This episode produced by Sean Flynn (@wxgeek)
We'll be back on September 18th for Season Two!



Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/jackiewatchesstuff)

Show Notes Transcript

For our final episode of Season One, Jackie and Jarrett Saia complete their Jedi training and defeat the Empire!

Must know:

  • Jedi training requires a lot of upper body strength
  • Consent is cool
  • CGI ruined the original films

The "JACKIE WATCHES STUFF Fan Rendition of the Star Wars Theme" was written and composed by Sean Flynn, and performed by the JACKIE WATCHES STUFF House Band.

The JACKIE WATCHES STUFF House Band is:
Kazoo I: Sean Flynn
Kazoo II: Sean Flynn
Bass Kazoo I: Sean Flynn
Marimba: Sean Flynn
Half-moon tambourine: Sean Flynn
Maraca: Sean Flynn
LP Session Shaker: Sean Flynn

Follow us on Twitter @JackieWatches
This episode produced by Sean Flynn (@wxgeek)
We'll be back on September 18th for Season Two!



Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/jackiewatchesstuff)

Jackie:

I really don't want to do this.

Jarrett:

I feel like that's what the fans really want.

Jackie:

Oh god. Second episode this is.

Jarrett:

Masterful.

Jackie:

Welcome to Jackie Watches Stuff. This is a podcast chronicling my cinematic quest to finally watch the movies I probably should have already seen and I'm bringing my friends along with me. Anyway, Jared. We're back. We're gonna go learn how to be Jedi.

Jarrett:

I want to be a Jedi so bad.

Jackie:

It's so exciting. So Luke, we last left some drama. We left Leia and the gang flying through an asteroid field and now Luke is going to go meet Yoda because Ben whispered in his ear "Go find Yoda." And so Yoda is kind of a jerk. Didn't really realize that was gonna happen. Every fantasy image I kind of had of Yoda is that he's this all knowing and super helpful, but he kind of shows up and he's like kind of a little jerk.

Jarrett:

So am I correct in assuming that you had an idea of who Yoda the character was way before you watched this?

Jackie:

Yeah, I mean, I knew Yoda was the little green dude. I knew he kind of was either all knowing or a wizard maybe kind of vibe. I didn't realize he was kind of the Jedi Master that would train Luke. I had no idea, but I knew he was kind of a good guy. All knowing thing.

Jarrett:

In 1980, when this comes out, this totally floors people and this is actually kind of the setup and why he behaves that way because it's like, I'm here to learn from this you know, great all powerful Jedi Master and you look at this, you know, tiny ancient looking literal Muppet. Jim Henson's people made the Yoda costume and I think that's why it's funny that he also sounds, the same guy who voiced Miss Piggy did this one too. It's part of the Henson and Muppet family. You know, this idea that you don't have to be gigantic and super powerful to be very strong and The Force kind of works a different way. I always felt like this was like a really cool reveal that this this ancient wrinkly guy is the most powerful Jedi that there is because it could have been this this gigantic super strong warrior and that would have made a lot more sense, but I feel like this really resonated with people a lot more.

Jackie:

And that's a good point, I guess. Even though I am watching it for the first time, I wasn't surprised. I know who Yoda is. And so being in the shoes of you who's sitting there for the first time, you've never seen this thing before, of course you don't think it's the all powerful Jedi because the only other Jedi you've been introduced to at this point is Obi Wan and Luke and so you assume they're human. So I guess that is a really good thing to bring up. Your're my reality check on watching this.

Jarrett:

Thank you. I always feel like, watching this again and sort of the introduction of Yoda and he's being a little bit of a jerk, Luke shows so much restraint. I mean, let's talk about this. First of all, Luke is doing nothing but crash in this movie. He crashes his snowspeeder on Hoth, he crashes his X-wing into the swamps of Dagobah, he pulls himself out. This is not going the way that he thought it was going to go. And this little Muppet comes over and is being annoying and he's eating his dinner and he's hitting R2 with a stick and he's just like "Come on, man. You're making a mess. Let's not do this." Like, you know, he had a gun. He had a lightsaber. He could have been a real jerk if he wanted to and he was like "No, I'm tired. It's been a long day."

Jackie:

It is a wonder that Luke did not attack or feel more threatened, maybe just because of the size of this thing, but in any case, Yoda, well the thing, we don't really know what it is, but Yoda says "Oh, I'll take you to Yoda." After Luke whines and begs to be taken, and then wines once he finds out that it's Yoda to train him to be a Jedi and he's like "I promise I'm not a screw up" and it's like okay, but...

Jarrett:

You had your chance, dude. We gave you many opportunities?

Jackie:

You kind of are, right? And so yeah, they go through, I

Jarrett:

Yeah, so coming into this fresh, did you think so mean, if I were to make this a Jedi training montage, it involves a lot of weird handstands, carrying Yoda on his back and going in this forest where he fights a fake Darth Vader and sees himself and has like a weird out-of-body experience. And that's how you become a Jedi. much of being a Jedi would be cardio?

Jackie:

I had no idea. I did not know it required so many handstands or lifting rocks. I guess. I don't know what I thought it was gonna be, but I did not think it would be this.

Jarrett:

So, how did you feel about the cave scene because that's sort of like, not super divisive, but a lot of people say it's one of the most iconic scenes ever and a lot of other people are like, it kind of like, you know, take some of the steam out of the movie a little bit.

Jackie:

It didn't really do anything for me. It just kind of gave me a bit of a head tilt and I thought maybe it was just epic foreshadowing, but at this point we already know that Darth Vader is his father so that foreshadowing is a little bit gone.

Jarrett:

At this point we don't know that.

Jackie:

Oh, we don't? Oh my gosh, my movie lines! Okay, so it is foreshadowing.

Jarrett:

Kind of yeah. And George Lucas was going for, you know, this is basically Plato's allegory of the cave, which if you're really into ancient philosophy, is super profound. If you're not, it's like, huh, okay, he could just be more patient. That's sort of, Yoda's whole thing is like you can't rush into things. You've got to be more patient, which is kind of foreshadowing of like his decision that comes a few minutes later.

Jackie:

Yeah, because again, we're whining and whining and whining. He's like "I have to go right now." And they're like "No, you really need to finish this." I think even Obi Wan shows up and is like "Hey, stop it." And they're both like "No, really, you need to stay here and do this training.

Jarrett:

Before we get into this point, we have to talk about the scene where Yoda lifts the X- wing out of the swamp, I think your listeners will revolt if we don't address that.

Jackie:

Oh, absolutely. This was on my list because again, teen angst. We're whining and he's like "Oh, I can't do it. I just can't."

Jarrett:

It's too big. It's too hard. It's impossible. You do it if you're so special.

Jackie:

If you were doing your training there, buddy, you probably could have done it. And then little Yoda is like "Watch this" and then does it. And then you would think that Luke would be like "Oh, wait, maybe I should stick around?" Nope. doesn't do that.

Jarrett:

is like, you know, he's like "Can't do it. It's impossible." Yoda doesn't say anything. He just kind of walks up and then just silently does it like a badass and Luke is like "Oh my god, I can't believe it." And Yoda is like, "That is why you fail." That is one of the best burns in all of sci-fi. He's completely right and Luke is a whiny little bitch.

Jackie:

The whole thing is like teen angst and it's annoying. So in any case, Luke's gonna go and save his friends because he senses them, I guess, being in trouble.

Jarrett:

Kind of. I know you have feelings about a point later and so I'm going to save this for that, but there's a reason why he's able to feel them.

Jackie:

Right, which I do, well, we'll get there. So, he kind of feels like something's going on, but we learn that as they're flying through this asteroid field, Han and Leia and the gang, they get to the Cloud City and they meet up with Lando, but dun dun dun, Lando double cross them because he basically, not teamed up with Darth Vader, but Darth Vader basically threatened him and he's like "Yup, sounds good. I'll turn in my friends right now." Which I mean, if I were Lando, I don't know, would I have done it? Probably.

Jarrett:

Well, they kind of say with exposition as they're sort of walking to the meet and greet with Darth Vader "This operation seems like it's illegal. How haven't you been busted yet?" And Lando is like "You know, we're small enough, we've kind of stayed off of their radar." And you know, you kind of got the sense that that was kind of what they were banking on and because I think Boba Fett was able to trace the trajectory of the Falcon to Cloud City, the Empire was able to get there first and that sort of veil of secrecy was blown. This was really Lando's only move and you're supposed to kind of not like him a little bit, but he doesn't really have a choice. The Empire shows up like "You've been running this illegal operation. We could totally bust you or you could work with us and you'll be fine." That's his only move, but that's another one of those reveals where it's like, you know, the first time you're watching this, no one is expecting Darth Vader to be sitting at the head of a table having his aperitif being like "Oh, we would be honored if you would join us."

Jackie:

Yeah, I get that. I mean, it definitely didn't feel like, because he even kind of explains to Han very quickly like "I didn't really have a choice, but I'm super sorry. Good luck" kind of a thing. But then he double double crosses so he comes around, but at the same time he turns his friends in which, not stellar. But there's a whole scene of Han being tortured, which is Darth Vader's lore to get Luke to come to the Cloud City today so they can...

Jarrett:

Yeah, because we remember from a new hope that when when the Empire destroys the planet of Alderaan, that was a really bad time for everyone on Alderaan and Obi Wan was able to feel that through The Force and so you kind of get this idea that that really profound pain or suffering can be felt and, you know, obviously Han Solo is ot a planet full of people, but ecause Luke has a special onnection to him, that sort f needed to happen for Luke o feel it. So that's, you know, I love that line of like, Han So o comes back from the torture nd he's like "Well, they didn t ask me any questions" like no, they didn't need to. The point w s you had to suffer so that Luk could feel it and he's coming n w.

Jackie:

And now that he's on his way they have to test the carbon freezer thing and they do it with Han. I guess I didn't remember that I knew that he was carbonized because I think I've seen him in carbon before in either like a picture or truly when I went to Disney World, but I didn't put it all together when I was watching this movie and I kind of thought that they were going to twist their way out of it and, you know, shoot them up kind of thing, but it doesn't happen. Kind of a bummer.

Jarrett:

That like Han and Leia didn't somehow take all the guns and shoot them and break out of there?

Jackie:

Yeah, I kind of thought that was gonna end up happening.

Jarrett:

There's a total reason that that's the route that they went. In the original, you know, everyone signed on for the original movie plus one sequel should it kind of happen. So everyone is doing this movie either because they really want to or they're under contract. And Harrison Ford, who plays Han Solo, is sort of, you know, famously not enamored with the whole Star Wars thing. It's just a job for him. It doesn't really hold any special place in his heart and he was kind of grumbling during the filming of this movie, kind of hanging out of the system. They were really, really afraid that Harrison Ford wouldn't come back to do "Return of the Jedi" and they knew at this point that there was going to be a third movie so they needed a contingency in case they couldn't get him back. And so what they thought of was "we're gonna freeze him and have him sent off to the bounty hunter." And did you ever notice that the character of Lando and the character of Han Solo are kind of similar? They're kind of like lovable, charismatic scoundrels. Yeah. So if Harrison Ford wasn't going to come back, Lando Calrissian was going to basically kind of step in and fill his shoes and just kind of become that character, like the same role in the story, but it's a different guy now. And I don't know if you noticed, but at the very end of "Empire Strikes Back" when Lando and Chewie are flying the Falcon out of there, Lando is literally wearing Han Solo's clothes as if Han had a spare outfit in a locker in the Millennium Falcon.

Jackie:

I did not notice that. That is very interesting. So he's just kind of casually slide into the...

Jarrett:

Yeah, they built in a contingency and like, Okay, if Harrison Ford doesn't come back. Well, I guess they never got him back from Jabba the Hutt, but Lando is here and Lando is just as good and don't we love Lando, everyone?

Jackie:

Yeah, don't worry about Han. He's fine. He's fine. Interesting. Well, now we get both of them, which is, you know, exciting. So I'm glad that they're back. I will say I did not see the whole double crossing thing happening at all. I was actually surprised so I did not think that he was just going to show or Darth Vader was just going to show up on the Cloud City like that and just take over everything. And like I said, I really expected there to be a big shootout or something, but doesn't really work. So, Luke gets there and there's this back and forth of like "It's a trap. Don't do it!" And Luke, of course, needs to be the hero and so he runs out and goes right into the trap.

Jarrett:

What trap? I should go toward the trap? Okay.

Jackie:

You want me to come with you? And so they have this semi iconic Luke vs. Darth Vader, one of several, not several, one of two, I think, fights and Luke gets his butt totally kicked and his hand chopped off. Whoops!

Jarrett:

And I think a big aspect of this fight is that, you know, they really make it obvious that Luke has not finished his training. He's not ready yet. This fight goes on for a while and Luke scores one or two lucky hits, but for the most part Darth Vader is just oying with him. Like at eve y point he could kill him if h wanted to, but he's not tryin to kill him. He's trying t capture him

Jackie:

Right? And so Darth Vader does the typical villain thing where he goes on a monologue and explains his whole plan, which is great for me as a viewer because it really lays it out for me. And so we learn that he wants to team up with Luke and destroy the Emperor and rule the galaxy as father and son, which, here's where I have feelings, and of course, I'm sorry, I should get to the big part. We get the reveal "Luke, I am your father."

Jarrett:

Okay, so, I told you the salty story of David Prowse in the first one so that I could tell you this story right now. That's so interesting that they wouldn't tell anyone. Okay. So this is actually one of the biggest most secret reveals in all of movie history. In fact, only like four people knew that this was the line. So like, I told you before David Prowse i in the Darth Vader costume. H thought he was gonna be th voice. He was kind of cheated a l of that. He was a little bit alty and in the years between A New Hope" and "Empire Strikes ack," he becomes a little bit utspoken to the media. He's sor of like a little bit just ann yed that he's not a more promi ent part in this thing and there s a lot of anecdotes of the film ng of "The Empire Strikes Back" here at this point he's figured out they're not going to use his audio so he's purpos ly flubbing the lines. You know hat whole scene in the astero d field where they're changin the Millennium Falcon? They're chasing the Millennium Falcon, sorry. So apparently when th y were recording that every t me that Darth Vader says asteroi s, the actor David Prowse say "Hemorrhoids" just to try and et a reaction. There's a famous line that, I've heard it where i 's like "Hemorrhoids do ot concern me, commander." And he is purposely trying to get rise out of the actors on set because he's just like over it. o, going into this, they were re lly afraid that David Prow e was going to leak this bi reveal that Darth Vader is L ke Skywalker's father. S , in the script the line was "Ob Wan never told you the truth. arth Vader didn't kill your fat er. Obi Wan killed your fathe ." And then that's kind of hat Luke was reacting to and so he first time anyone ever he rs "No, Luke. I am your fath r" is during the screening an there's one point where during hat, Mark Hamill, who plays Luke Skywalker, famously leans over in the theater to George Luca is like "Why didn't you te l me? I would have done that t tally different." They really were afraid of it because it was going to be a huge reveal. Because again, this is 1980. Big plot twists in movies are not as big of a thing as they are now. This is like the pre M. Night Shyamalan era where everything kind of had to twist or be like unique or special or different. But they were just really afraid that David Prowse inside of the Darth Vader costume was gonna leak this information so they let everyone believe that the big reveal was "No, Obi Wan really killed Luke's father."

Jackie:

Well, now we know that's not the case because Darth Vader kind of killed him

Jarrett:

From a certain point of view,

Jackie:

which...Okay, I'm just going to talk about it now. I'm going to talk about my feelings now, even though it technically comes up in the next movie where Obi Wan says exactly what you just said that "From a certai point of view." Darth Vader h d not once lied to Luke at all When they met he was like "I'm your dad. This is what I want to do to you. I want to make you ule on the dark side with me. ike, let's go. I don't want to k ll you. I just want to capture y u and make you turn to the dark ide. Let's go." Meanwhil we've got Yoda who's like "Oh, yeah, like, I'll take you to Yo a. Haha kidding. It's me. YOLO. And then we've got Ben who' like "Oh, yeah, I know. I t ld you that. Yeah. Well, fro a certain point of view, I g ess." And then also, I mean, we will get to it in the next mov e, but dying Yoda says "Oh, yeah. And by the way, you have sister." Why would Luke sta on this side of the fight? T ere has been nothing but hone ty from the dark side. Nothin but honesty.

Jarrett:

I know you've already covered the Wedding Singer on this show and I feel like this is where one of the lines like "This is information that could have been brought to my attention yesterday." Itwould have been a really big help.

Jackie:

Yesterday, last week, when we started our Jedi training together, when we met. Any of those things. So those are my feelings about that and I'm sure I'll talk about them again when Yoda dies.

Jarrett:

Even in "Return of the Jedi" right before he dies, Luke asked him straight like "Hey, Yoda, is Darth Vader my father? And Yoda is going to be like "Um, I need to take a nap."

Jackie:

"I need to go to sleep." Dude, you're about to die. Just do it. Rip the bandaid off. Ah! Okay, now that that rant is over, I do have to ask, how old is Han Solo supposed to be? Because I skipped over another iconic line to get right to "Luke, I'm your father." I missed the "I love you" "I know" moment. I'm so sorry, audience. And I had a moment of like, how old is Han supposed to be and how old is Leia supposed to be?

Jarrett:

I mean, they never address it, but in "A New Hope," Harrison Ford is in his 30s and Carrie Fisher is 19. So this is three years later so he's in his mid to late 30s, Carrie Fisher's in her early 20s.

Jackie:

That feels interesting, but seemingly consensual so I will support it.

Jarrett:

Another interesting factoid about that scene is that that famous line is "I love you." "I know." The original line was gonna be "I love you too" and they did it like 18 times and it just always felt really bad and really forced and then Harrison Ford on one take just kind of said it off hand as a joke and everyone kind of laughed, but then they kind of said "Actually, that really works. Let's go with that."

Jackie:

Interesting. I mean, it fits the character, but also kind of fits Harrison Ford.

Jarrett:

He's basically telling that to her the whole movie ever since they're on Hoth. It's like "You have feelings for me" and she's like "No, I don't. No, I don't. No, I don't. And then she's like "I love you." It's like, "I've been saying that for an hour and 20 minutes."

Jackie:

And to go back to like, viewing in the lens of 2020. Like, come on. All of that stuff of like, you like me, you like me, you like me. No, don't love it.

Jarrett:

He doesn't take no for an answer.

Jackie:

Oh, it's bad, it's so bad. I have several spin off options for this podcast of how characters would have benefited from therapy, but also the lens of 2020, how things can be better. It's bad. Anyway, so we see kind of the fighting. Luke loses his hand. also has to deal with the fact that he learns that Darth Vader is his father and reconcile with the fact that Obi Wan lied to him, strike one. So as Leia, and this is kind of alluded to again, as Leia and the gang are kind of flying away, she has this sense that we have to go back and I wonder why there's a sense and I don't know, I have to ask you: Did you see that as foreshadowing the first time you saw this movie? Because, like I said, it was spoiled for me unfortunately so I knew exactly what that meant right when it happened.

Jarrett:

I mean, the first time that I watched these movies, I was 11 and I definitely did not pick up on that that was where they were going. I don't feel like anyone else really knew they were going there either. They sort of defined The Force and its capabilities a little bit better in this movie, but I think one of the big advantages of the original trilogy is they left it sort of open ended. It's not like The Force is just going to fix any problem we have, but we don't really know everything that it can do in an interesting kind of a way, but I know that kind of behind the scenes of "Return of the Jedi" when they're reading in the script that like "Oh, Leia is my sister." Mark Hamill leans over to the writers and is like "Really? Are we just like full on soap opera now?" Because I feel like they thought that that was a little bit hammy. I'm sure some people kind of caught it, but again, this is 1980. The modern story structure that we're used to seeing where everything is rehashed. Everyone is related to someone else. The thing that you're expecting to happen is kind of going to happen. It just wasn't as much of a thing so I really do think that this took audiences by surprise a little bit. You've got to imagine they thought of it to some degree because as Luke is flying off in his huff to go lose to Darth Vader and goes to Obi Wan and Yoda are having their little talk and Obi Wan is like "Oh, the boy is our last hope." And Yoda's like "No, there is another" It's like, okay, well, they're building something here, but I think they weren't exactly clear what they wanted to do with it. They were leaving themselves options and they were going to figure it out later because again, they weren't 100% sure that Carrie Fisher was going to even come back for the third one.

Jackie:

Right. Yeah, I was gonna say it. It basically set the ball perfectly because it gave it a lot of options. And like you said, I don't think anyone probably caught it necessarily. Maybe some people had theories, but I think the average audience member probably didn't catch anything about it. So they do go back and they save Luke. Yay! They go into hyperspeed and it kind of just ends. Darth Vader kills another lieutenant with his spooky, scary hand Force thing. Luke gets his hand back. They look out into the space field stars and just kind of setting itself up for "Return of the Jedi."

Sean:

Hey, folks. Your producer, Sean here. You know what's up. Disney litigation copyright. Que the kazoos.

Jackie:

Luke Skywalker has returned to his home planet of Tatooine in an attempt to rescue his friend Han Solo from the clutches of the vile gangster, Jabba the Hutt. Little does Luke know that the Galactic Empire has secretly begun construction on a new armored Space Station even more powerful than the first dreaded Death Star. When completed, this ultimate weapon will spell certain doom for the small band of Rebels struggling to restore freedom to the galaxy. The fact that this opened with C-3PO and R2-D2 to just strolling through the desert presumably, just knocking on Jabba the Hutts door to say hey was such a surprise to me.

Jarrett:

How did you think it was gonna open?

Jackie:

I have no idea. But it was just like "Oh, we just knock on his door? Isn't he like an evil dude?" But apparently we're just, and I'm like mimicking the way C-3PO walks right now like, knock, knock, knock. Here we are. And they show up in this like dance club thing. Yeah,

Jarrett:

I mean, so we learn later that Luke has thought of this plan to rescue Han and it has many, many different complicated stages and one of them was just "I'm gonna send the droids in to kind of give this message and ask, but I need them placed in jJabba's palace for my daring and very complicated escape so they need to be there." But yeah, it's totally confusing, but R2 knows what the plan is and C-3PO doesn't and so I feel like we as the audience are like from C-3PO perspective like, this doesn't make any sense. Why would they just go there and it's like oh, actually Luke has a plan and he needs them there for this later part.

Jackie:

Mhm. Yes, which we see because, fast forward all the way, we see R2 shoot the lightsaber at him and all these things. It's all planned, which is bananas.

Jarrett:

And again, as an audience member watching this for the first time, at the end of "Empire Strikes Back," Luke's hand gets cut off, his lightsaber goes with it. We actually see that fall to the planet below. He doesn't get that back. It makes sense that he would build a new lightsaber for this new movie, but as the audience we don't know that. He doesn't necessarily know how to make a lightsaber. He was given his first one, which was his dad's old one. I feel like a lot of people are like, when he has to fight the Rancor, man, that would have been so much easier if he had his lightsaber, but I think they were really going for that dramatic tension of like, we don't necessarily know that he has a new lightsaber so that it's an even cooler reveal when it sort of comes at that last moment and he just totally beats up on everyone.

Jackie:

Mhm. Absolutely. Before we get into the much needed conversation that we've been holding out on about CGI, I just want to mention, because I wrote this in my notes when they arrive and meet Java, I wrote "A lot of bad feelings about a woman chained up dancing for him." But you know, just another moment. Doesn't feel great. This isn't how we treat people. Just

Jarrett:

This is how Jabba runs things. We are we are not for the record. supposed to like him.

Jackie:

And I mean, based on the way they interacted, I'm going to assume that it was not consensual. Just assuming.

Jarrett:

No, no, no.

Jackie:

Based on the fact that he threw her into a pit to die.

Jarrett:

In screenwriting there's always this thing of like, they call it the "save the cat moment" where a person saves the cat. You sort of know that they're meant to be the hero and maybe they're a little bit flawed, but they're basically good because they've saved this cat. I feel like "I'm gonna chain up dancers" is the opposite of the save the cat moment like "Oh, this is this is an unqualified bad guy. He's he worst guy ever. We hate him.

Jackie:

Yes, absolutely. So now we have to put in the conversation about how CGI killed this film trilogy. Not killed, that's a little little dramatic, but altered it to the point where people tell me all the time that I should see the originals, which is concerning.

Jarrett:

It is literally called Jedi Rock.

Jackie:

Right. So there's that, but then also, I want to say right before that, we see a Jabba, this is the technically in the originals. The first time we see Jabba, right?

Jarrett:

Yes, correct. He is mentioned, but this is the first time we see him. Yeah, they built a Jabba. He looks great.

Jackie:

It looks great. And then knowing that I watched the special edition of the first movie, that CGI of him talking to Han was such a waste of time. Yes. Did not love. So bad. But anyway, talk to me about your feelings.

Jarrett:

Oh, man. Well, okay. There's a lot of things that are happening during this part. Which part are you talking about?

Jackie:

I am talking about Jabba.

Jarrett:

Okay. There's nothing to talk about. It's terrible. It doesn't need to be there. We don't need to see it. I remember watching this in the theaters when they rereleased "Return of the Jedi" as a special edition. It's the first time the whole world is getting to watch this in 1997. I was just like "Huh." And I didn't think about it that much, but as I've rewatched these movies over and over again, every time it grates at me a little bit more and I rewatched all of these so that I could be prepared to alk about them on your podcast and Jedi rock is the only scene that I had to fast forward through because I just couldn't take it another time.

Jackie:

I'm so sorry. But I appreciate you at least kind of bearing through it. George Lucas wanted kind of a second whack at it, but there is a point ,it's a word my mother uses all the time, which is like "Ongepotchket," which means like "You touch it too much." It's like, if you make a macaroni picture frame and then you add glitter and then popsicle sticks and googly eyes, it's ongepotchket and you don't need that much and I think that's what we reached with this trilogy. And that will be my hot take on special edition.

Jarrett:

This is happening o the same planet as the o iginal movie and it's six years later so we can only assume tha

Jackie:

And they probably couldn't get them again. the hot musical act that was t e Jizz Whalers has broken up y this point and had a falli g out and...

Jarrett:

They were broken up or they were way too famous now so they get this this weird CGI muppet and these weird CGI singers with real human character dancers with 1997 technology and none of it really goes together.

Jackie:

Yeah, it was it was a rough...I completely understand why you fast forwarded it. It was not great. But the other thing that really struck me about all of this, I mean, amongst other things, like the fact that Luke had to basically show up in full Jedi gear and fight a monster and stuff, like Leia getting sexy moment basically. So I have to ask you, Jared, how old were you when you watched this movie? Did you feel like it wasn't appropriate age?

Jarrett:

So, I knew we were going to talk about this. I knew the conversation was going to go here. I think the first time that I watched these movies all the way through, I was maybe 10 or 11 and I remember seeing that outfit and thinking like "Hmm, that's interesting." But then, you know, watched it in midd e school, watch it in high s hool and it's like, oh, oh!

Jackie:

It makes sense now. Mhm. Yep. And I think we'll just leave it there. I didn't love that. We didn't really need it. Again, non consensual chaining moment. Don't love it. But it does come back around because she literally pulls it around Jabba's neck and kills him so that's where we're at with that.

Jarrett:

Can we talk about one of the sweetest moments in all of this is the fight with the Rancor? He kills this monster. No one is expecting it. He's the total underdog and everyone is outraged like, what? And then they bring in the Rancor owner and trainer and he's just sobbing because his friend and it's like everyone loves someone and there's always two sides to a story and this guy loved this hideous monster and this is like the worst day in his whole life. I always feel for him. The two moments I always feel super sad about are this guy has to look upon his dying pet. And later, during the big Endor battle when one of the Ewoks dies and the other Ewok throws himself over him and it's just really sad like, oh my God.

Jackie:

I thought we covered all the points of view that have not been covered yet in this movie series and everything else, but maybe that's another point of view we need to see is the owner.

Jarrett:

Two hours of him just training this rancor and loving him and giving him treats and scratching his belly. And then this douchebag shows up and drops a gate on him and kills him and it's like, what?

Jackie:

That's so sad. Alright. Well, TM on that one. We're gonna write that story. So the next section I call "Yoda, the asshole" because again, as I've mentioned, come on! He's sick and old and dying and he says "Oh, yeah, there's another Skywalker. Oh, yeah. Darth Vader's your dad. Mhm." Like, what? Why did you wait this long? And like you said, he's kind of like "I don't know what you're talking about. I can't. I gotta go to sleep late."

Jarrett:

It's nap time.

Jackie:

It's nap time for you. I will admit, I did not expect Yoda to die. I honestly didn't think that he could die, but here we are. So, you know, it happened and Obi Wan shows up and tries to defend it, but again, come on.

Jarrett:

Obi Wan's whole speech is like "Really, Luke, you're the jackass. You just need to see it from my point of view.

Jackie:

And that's called gaslighting, Jarrett. And that's not okay.

Jarrett:

So I know you opened this this episode with with your faithful recreation of the Yoda voice. An interesting bit of canon is he says in this movie that he's 900 years old and a

ot of people have always asked:

ell, why does Yoda talk that ay? The reason that the writers ame up with is because he's 900 ears old and he comes from a t me where presumably 900 years a o, everyone in the galaxy talked this way and that was just how hey did it. And, you know, language evolves over time and over species, but because he's s old, that's why he talks s strangely

Jackie:

Interesting. And I mean, he doesn't talk super strange I will say. I thought it was going to be jarble, like out of order words all the time, but he pretty much, so it's not too far.

Jarrett:

Like if you were magically transported to like 1600s England you'd have a fair time understanding what they were saying, but it would sound a little bit weird to you.

Jackie:

You could find the bathroom and get the Wi-Fi password. Totally fine.

Jarrett:

Yes. That medieval Wi-Fi was awesome.

Jackie:

Absolutely. So the one thing that did bother me about this part is that Luke kind of magically puts together that Leia is his sister and for something that is such a plot twist, You know, we learned that Darth Vader's his father, for something that's such a plot twist, it's so casual, I think.

Jarrett:

I feel like in Star Wars, certainly the Original Trilogy, this idea of "Search your feelings. You know it to be true" is their way of saying "Well, the plot's not going to move itself. Let's get this going."

Jackie:

That's fair. I mean, I guess he has to do it for the audience like "Hey guys, if you haven't figured it out yet..."

Jarrett:

It's like, Yoda spoke of your twin sister. It's like ha, who's literally the only other female in this galaxy that we have seen? Oh, of course, it's Leia.

Jackie:

It must be Leia.

Jarrett:

It would be even funnier if it was Mon Mothma, the leader of the Rebels, who we meet a couple scenes after this. It's like, oh, yeah, that lady's your sister. Like no, of course it's Leia.

Jackie:

So I guess the whole, I mean, really, we kind of just, not just show up to Star Wars for the fighting, but really we finally get into it. They do a pretty good job of shoving all the plot development in the beginning and then getting the fighting stuff towards the end. Then we get quickly rolling the snowball down the hill of "Oh, the weapons are down on the Death Star. We have to go right now." Darth Vader is itching to go find Luke and the Emperor is like "Quiet, young grasshopper. Your time will come."

Jarrett:

The introduction of the Emperor in this movie is another one of those moments that I always love watching because this is the first time we're meeting him. They have been talking about this guy for two movies now. When Darth Vader shows up in the very opening scene to the Death Star, 20 stormtroopers come out to greet him, but the Emperor shuttle arrives and the whole station has turned out and it's like, oh oh, daddy's home.

Jackie:

Yeah, yep. Oh, yeah. And I didn't realize we were going to meet him so that was a whole thing, but in any case, at the at the end of the day you see kind of three stories unwinding. We see Darth Vader basically begging the Emperor to go find Luke. We see the ground crew and we see the aircrew pretty much fighting the whole time. So really it's just a lot of pew pewing, but I can't go without talking about the Ewoks because this movie is literally nothing without Ewoks.

Jarrett:

Yeah, okay, so you've already covered the point of Han shot first, but the second thing as a newly inducted member of this series, you have to have an opinion on the Ewoks, eithercsuper positive or super negative, but you need to go strongly in one direction or the other.

Jackie:

Oh, I am strongly positive. I mean, you're pro Ewok, not only because they are

Jarrett:

Definitely. And I've got a theory that anyone who saw these movies sort of after they all came out is going to be a fan of the Ewoks versus people who are seeing this for the first time in theaters are a little bit more "Ooh, I really liked the dark tones of Empire Strikes Back and this was too kiddy" but I feel like anyone afterwards was really pro Ewok. darling, but they really kind of helped save the day eventually. Yeah. I won't spend a lot of time talking about it, but something that's really been covered in a lot of detail is where did George Lucas get a lot of his inspiration for these different points? We know with the first one he was really enamored with this idea of the Vietnam War and a technologically inferior people sort of doing their thing and overcoming a superior force and that was meant to be originally, like the Rebels, their technology isn't as good as the Empire. They don't have as good as ships, but they're, they're plucky and they persist and they do it. I feel like George Lucas kind of doubles down on that in "Return of the Jedi where it's like the Ewoks are literally as primitive as you can get. They have rocked-tip spears and they till managed to defeat the lite legion of the Emperor's upposedly best troops. Yeah, which, to go back to our earlier discussion about the good of the Stormtrooper uniform, like really, guys? You got rocks thrown at you? Really? I feel like you can suspend your disbelief a lot with the stormtroopers, but it kind of comes crashing down at like, you were shot with a rock tip arrow in the shoulder and you still kind of go down.

Jackie:

Yoy aren't dead. You're absolutely not dead

Jarrett:

You're maybe not even bleeding. We don't know.

Jackie:

You maybe didn't even notice it honestly. That's interesting that people have strong opinions. I mean, I can honestly say I instantly was like "Oh, look, it's darling and fuzzy." I mean, it also has like a kind of evil looking face so it's not too childish. It's not like a teddy bear, teddy bear.

Jarrett:

But the phrase murder teddy bear has been thrown around in describing the Ewoks. It's like teddy bears who want to suck your bone marrow.

Jackie:

Oh, I mean, alright, that tracks for this movie, truly.

Jarrett:

And this is another one where if this were made in 2020, the Ewoks would have absolutely been barely passable CGI and it would have been okay, but they hired as many little people as they could find and they put them in uncomfortable teddy bear suits. And I love that one scene where the Stormtrooper physically picks up and body slams the Ewok, knowing that there's a little person in an uncomfortable teddy bear suit who's hitting the ground with some force there.

Jackie:

It is very sad. But we meet them and of course Leia is like Snow White in this moment of like "Here, eat this food. Here see my helmet" and it's adorable. And then basically C-3PO is an asshole again and becomes their god casually and then doesn't leverage that to save his friends.

Jarrett:

This is one of my favorite parts of this whole movie. It's like "It would be improper for me to impersonate a deity" as they're tied up and about ready to be put on fire.

Jackie:

Oh, I was screaming at the television, truly. It's so bad. It's so so bad. And so basically, they get welcomed into the Ewok tribe and this is where Luke tells Leia everything, like lays it out. Like "By the way, you're my sister. That kiss we had NBD. That's our dad, no big deal. Also, I'm going to ask you about your mom, no reason." And Luke decides "I'm going to go and get Vader and I'm not going to fight him. I'm going to make him good again." And this reminds me of every time I'm like "If I just stay with him a little longer, I can fix him. I swear I can fix him." And this is another entry in my "if characters went to therapy" session of the podcast where I talk about how if Luke had gone to therapy and said "Hey, therapist, I feel like I could fix my dad." Therapist would be like "Let's talk about why you feel that way." And we would get to the root of it and no, you cannot fix him.

Jarrett:

Can we talk about Leia's big reveal post being accepted by the Ewoks for, she's got this new pretty dress and this new fancy hairstyle like, did she do that herself? Are the Ewoks experts at cosmetology?

Jackie:

I don't know. I mean, are they kind of like the helpful rats in Cinderella, where they also can make dresses? That's kind of what I'm feeling. But maybe it was her? I mean, she has like the longest hair. She's got to know some good hairstyles to keep that stuff back. Maybe the people who dressed her when she was with Jabba taught her how to deal with her hair? I don't know. And again, she does kind of have a costume change moment. Where did that dress come from? The Ewoks are not that tall.

Jarrett:

She's certainly like, you're on a self mission to blow up a shield generator and get out of there as quick as possible. You're not bringing a change of clothes and if you are, that change of clothes is probably not a dress.

Jackie:

No. And Leia is not the kind of person to bring a dress to say "Oh, I have to look good doing it. She's the one that's just throwing her hair back in what is truly a beautiful braid, but to get it in the helmet and just going so that is a good question. I don't know where she got that dress from. But maybe she fit in in her bag? Who knows?

Jarrett:

And then I love this moment of like, you know, C-3PO is a God for the first and only time in his life and Luke, through The Force, gives him magical godlike powers and C-3PO could have played it totally cool and just own the moment and he so does not.

Jackie:

No, absolutely not. C-3PO drives me crazy, as everybody knows, and I feel like feels the same way, but this was so annoying and even Han says it like "Hey, dude, could you maybe leverage this right now to save us as we're tied up here, buddy?" Doesn't work. So ridiculous. They do get out though. Truly because Leia's like "No, guys, it's fine." It's like, oh, really? That's all it took? And so Luke has C-3PO fly around as though he is a God because of The Force. Then we kind of see the fights happening all intercut and I'm not going to bounce back and forth, but really the big deal is that Luke surrenders himself to Darth Vader because Luke and Leia had the conversation about, you know, "I'm going to fix him. It's gonna be great. Everything's gonna be fine." And it doesn't work, naturally. So he surrenders himself to Darth Vader and he's like "No, gonna bring me to the Emperor. You're gonna turn to the light side. It's gonna be great." And I don't understand why Luke is so dead set on this and why he thinks this will work and why he's so committed to "fixing" his father that he has no relationship with that he just found out exists.

Jarrett:

Well, because I always kind of felt like watching this for the first time that in "Empire Strikes Back," Vader presumably didn't you really know that Luke was there either sothe fact they're all finding out about each other's existence at the same time is kind of weird and they're all dealing with new thoughts and feelings and Vader's offer in "The Empire Strikes Back" is like "Join me. We're gonna overthrow the Emperor and we're gonna do this together as father and son." Like a souped up version of bring your kid to work day. And I want to think that Luke is just like "I've never had a dad. I've always wondered about this" He didn't really know that he had me. This is all very confusing. This is such a young person thing, but I really believe he just thought that "If I can just get in a room and talk with him as a person, he's gonna see my way of thinking and how could he not go with me? Of course this is going to happen."

Jackie:

So naive, little Luke.

Jarrett:

Yeah, but you know, during that scene it works a little. He doesn't just shut him down. He kind of thinks about it for a second. Vader's like "No, that could be too big of a change for me. I'm gonna take you to the Emperor. He's your master now."

Jackie:

"Luke, I've kind of got this whole thing going. Do you see the cloak and the mask? I've kind of got a personal brand to keep up?"

Jarrett:

It's like I am like...

Jackie:

Don't think (inaudible).

Jarrett:

"I'm like two months away from making my employer match contribution on my space 401k, I really need this. I can't quit right now."

Jackie:

"You'll understand when you're older, son."

Jarrett:

"Luke, it is your father. You've got to think about these things. It's your future. I'm looking out for you."

Jackie:

That space 401k. So it doesn't work. I mean, it works a little, right? We'd make a little tiny chip in the giant block that is the obstacle in front of him. That was a terrible metaphor. It kind of works, but not really. And then of course, like all bad guys, the Emperor does his bad guy monologue and basically tells the Emperor or tells Luke "You can't control your feelings. You should come to the dark side. By the way, all your friends are getting shot at. Here, just take a look." And Luke looks outside and watches them get shot. Very dramatic.

Jarrett:

In all of sci fi, there is no one so good at being the bad guy as the Emperor. The whole prequel trilogy is the Emperor. In the sequel trilogy, which you haven't seen or heard of yet, after that kind of goes off the rails, they have to bring the Emperor back from the dead because it's like "he's our one cool thing we've got left so let's just do this." He's great. I love that moment of just like, you know, and this is again, a super naive, you know, he's not really a teenager at this point anymore, but he's kind of thinking in that sort of naive, young adult mindset of like "We're so clever. We had a plan. Soon I'll be dead and you're going to be dead with me." It's like "Oh, you mean this whole thing you had orchestrated? No, I've been behind that since the beginning. You're not smart. You're not cool. Like, this is all my plan." And he's like "Crap, he might be right."

Jackie:

Yeah, and then that's the whole kind of crux of it, I guess is he gives in to his anger and that's what the Emperor is doing. He's egging him on to get angry and say "Oh, come join me on the dark side. You can't control your anger and give in." And so therefore, even though he keeps saying "I don't want to fight you, Dad. I don't want to do it." They fight anyway.

Jarrett:

I feel like this is sort of the defining moment for Luke as a character and sort of like anyone who starts out good could maybe turn bad and what's the thing that turns them and in "Empire Strikes Back," Vader offers him the promise of power and wealth and riches, like "Join me and we're gonna rule the galaxy together and Luke's totally not interested. He'd rather jump to his death than join this evil guy. He does sort of get angry in "Return to the Jedi," but he's not just like pissed and lashing out. I really believe that he thinks that if he can kill the Emperor and Darth Vader right then, he could somehow stop this attack that's gonna kill his friends. So he does kind of turn a little bit, but it's for a really good reason. He kind of does it with with the right intentions as much as you can have the right intentions for just whacking someone with a laser sword.

Jackie:

I know. Well, he whacks him and cuts his hand off, which is like full circle. And so that kind of sparks the drama and this is of course all intercut with scuffles outside of the bunker. We see the Ewoks shooting their very menacing sword arrows apparently or stone arrows rather at the very shielded stormtroopers. No big deal. Lando is leading the fleet in the air and realizes that the defense shield isn't down yet. So there's a lot of interspersed high intensity drama in all of this, but it definitely starts to come to a head when the Emperor goes to kill Luke, which I truly did not see coming, I will be honest with you. And so he uses his electric looking, whatever it is, zappy power to start killing Luke. I don't know.

Jarrett:

It's his level 10 lightning bad guy powers.

Jackie:

That sounds right. He rolled a critical, nope, not a critical fail, a natural 20, that's it, and started zapping Luke and Luke screams out "Father, please!" And I don't know if this is a ploy like, he's trying to make Darth Vader soft or if he genuinely thinks that Darth Vader is gonna flip in that moment.

Jarrett:

I really think this is one where Luke has made a moral That's a good point because I think this is the first time stand. He could have killed Darth Vader. He could have done joined the Emperor and done exactly what the Emperor wanted. And he throws his lightsaber away. He says "No, I'm not gonna do it." And the Emperor is supposedly super powerful. We learn in the prequels, which I know we don't cover here, the Emperor does have a lightsaber that he uses there. He doesn't use now. He's so strong in the f rce. He could do somethin like use the Force to stop Luk 's heart or snap his neck or omething, but he uses the light ing because he's kind of a dick nd he just likes toying wit Luke. He really wants him to hurt. I believe like, you're being shocked with lightni g over and over again. This is eally, really bad. I don't eally think that Luke had though about this or planned for this. As the audience, this is the first time that we know that this is a power that the da k side has. This has never be n used before so I think like Lu e just didn't know what was g ing on and this is his last ditch effort. He's just sort of appealing. I don't think e knows if it's gonna work, b t this is just the thing tha comes to him in this moment we've ever seen a power like this. We've seen lightsabers, but that's just a tool. We've seen lasers and guns and things shooting, but those are all tools, but this is the first time we've seen an actual power come from a person. Right. And so for two movies now the Emperor has been like "We need to capture Luke Skywalker. He will be our most powerful ally. We really need him." And in this moment Luke's been like "Nope. Not interested. Nothing you can do." And so the Emperor really wants to make him hurt. This is what this is about. He's pissed off that he's invested so much time and energy into getting this kid and it's not gonna work out so he's like "I'm the bad guy."

Jackie:

That's fair. But it doesn't work because Vader's heart grew three sizes that day. It felt very damn cheesy.

Jarrett:

I've never thought about that before, but of course you're right. Of course that's the perfect comparison.

Jackie:

His heart grew three sizes and decided to save his son. And of course, he's already hurting or whatever, but he picks up the Emperor, which was again, not a move I thought was gonna happen. Picks up the Emperor and I think you and I had a had a previous conversation about this, but I definitely want your thoughts. I kind of thought that the Emperor didn't quite know how to control his powers because he was distracted almost like when Luke was doing his handstands in his original training and therefore just kind of surrounded him and also therefore Darth Vader and that's what kind of ended up killing him, but it could have been intentional that he then decided to kill Vader instead of Luke.

Jarrett:

I always kind of thought beause when I was a little kid watching this, I didn't really connect this but we see Luke cut Vader's hand off and then a couple scenes later, they're trying to escape the Death Star, which is about to blow up and Vader's like "Luke, help me take this mask off." "It looks like you're gonna die." And he's like "Well, nothing is gonna stop that now." And 11 year old me was like "Well, dude, you just got your hand cut off. That's not that bad, but his body is run by basically a really sophisticated iron lung and the Emperor has got the force and lightning magic andwhether it was accidental or I always wanted to believe that the Emperor really didn't know, obviously, that he was going to be betrayed by Vader there in the final moments and sort of used his last seconds before being thrown into the energy reactor to sort of use the Force to just mess him up. It's sort of like his final act of like "No one betrays me. I'm the Emperor." And then that's sort of why Vader knows that the suit is broken. He needs that to live. He's about to die.

Jackie:

That's fair, I guess. So, I mean, because Vader ultimately kind of sacrifices himself. I mean, even though he kind of knew he was gonna die anyway, but he makes use of his final moments instead of just throwing in the towel.

Jarrett:

It all comes full circle.

Jackie:

It does come full circle because his hand is chopped off, they're still scuffling in the air and on the ground, they get the shield up, Leia gets shot, I think. Yes, that is another time our producer, Sean did point this out that a stormtrooper did connect. He shot Leia in the shoulder.

Jarrett:

Yeah, but he didn't kill her like so with the accuracy of the stormtroopers, that almost seems like that was an accident. That he was he was probably going to hit the door next to her and like "Oh, I missed and I got her shoulder."

Jackie:

Oh, thank goodness. Thank goodness.

Jarrett:

So that's another moment where like "We can't break into this bunker. The whole success of our rebellion depends on breaking and blowing this up. Get R2 over here. He can do it so R2, who is like slicing into this, Han Solo users R2 as cover and then gets blown up. It's like Han Solo, get in front of R2-D2. R2-D2 should be using you for cover right now. He's the more important thing here!

Jackie:

It is all Han's fault is what I'm hearing.

Jarrett:

He's literally shielding himself behind R2-D2 who is like, the whole success of this mission is now on R2's shoulders and he gets shot.

Jackie:

I didn't notice that the first time truly because there was just so much going on in that scene, but now I'm just mad at Han because come on, you've got to protect R2. We can't lose him.

Jarrett:

So another interesting factoid about that Battle of Endor. I have already talked about that Harrison Ford was kind of not really in love with this franchise. Kind of did it under obligation. Came back for the third movie because they just offered him a ridiculous amount of money but made a plea to George Lucas, he really wanted his character to die in the Battle for Endor. He wanted to, you know, they had a lot of trouble getting in, they were ambushed. He wanted Han Solo to to valiantly sacrifice himself and be the one who blows it up so that his friends can blow up the Death Star and save the day whatever because he was sort of like just done with it. He didn't ever want to come back and the story goes that George Lucas thought about it for like two seconds and is like "No, I think the Han Solo action figure is gonna sell more if you stay alive so we're gonna keep you alive for this." And he was right.

Jackie:

Oh, my goodness. Well, I mean, I guess I'm glad he was still around because he does eventually kind of hotwire it, sort of or whatever, but I do want as we end this, I think the more important scene to talk about is Luke and Darth Vader's final moments together because it is very moving. Luke's like still very dead set on saving him. He says the whole line of "I have to save you" and he says "You already have." Your heart really did grow. But he does die and he says "I want to see you with my own eyes." So cute. And that's kind of the conclusion is Luke has to say goodbye to this man that he just met kind of thing and they need to get out of there and of course, they save the day. They blow up the Death Star. Whahoo. And it ends with a big dance party that has a lot of extra scenes in it.

Jarrett:

Which, if you're just watching these three movies for the first time ever probably don't make a lot of sense. Not at all. Where are these random locations we've never seen before? Why is someone yelling "Wesa free?" What does "Wesa free" mean? I don't know. Who is this random actor who's now appearing beside ghost Anakin or ghost Obi Wan and ghost Yoda? We've never seen him before. Lucas has surely never seen him before? Who is this guy?

Jackie:

All of those questions need to be answered. It was rough, especially watching this with my boyfriend who kept pointing out in the last however many like five minutes of this movie like "That's special effects. That's the special edition. That's added, that's added, that's added. Oh yeah, by the way, that's not the same actor. By the way, they added that." It was very sad to hear. So I did watch the original so I have seen the original.

Jarrett:

So you got to hear the song that everyone fell in love with for like 30 years?

Jackie:

Yes, and I am shocked and sad that that song didn't even stay into the special edition. I get why they wanted to add the different cities or whatever to weave it into one, two and three. I get why they added the actor to make it look like it's all one story, but you could have still had the song.

Jarrett:

But we got that instead and then, you know, fade to black. Roll credits.

Jackie:

And I can't believe that we made it through. We defeated the Empire! Or did we? I should say.

Jarrett:

I feel like we need to apologize to all the people for all the really interesting things and lines that we didn't reference or we didn't talk about because I think we could have spent two hours on each individual movie and still not covered it all. I prepared a whole section on how George Lucas' first wife really was the true hero of Star Wars and we're only here because of her, but that would have taken too long to get into so people can can Google that on their own.

Jackie:

That feels like bonus content to me, but yes, I know that you all have your own hot takes and your own emotional connections to this movie and this trilogy and so I'm sorry if Jarett or I offended you in any way. We did not mean to. We are just two podcasters cruising through the galaxy together. Jarett, I will see you, I guess in Episode VII.

Jarrett:

Looking forward to it.

Sean:

That's a wrap on season one of Jackie Watches Stuff. We're taking a little break, but we'll be back with season two on September 18th. In the meantime, I'd like to thank our supporters

in the academy on Patreon:

Paul, Briana, Jared, Thomas, Linda, Missy and Logan. If you'd like to join the Academy and get a shout out for supporting us, just visit patreon.com/jackiewatchesstuff. If you'd like to support us in a non monetary way, we'd love an iTunes review or just share us with your family and friends. Jackie Watches Stuff is hosted by Jackie Vetrano and produced by me, Sean Flynn. You can find me on Twitter @wxgeek. The Jackie Watches Stuff's fan rendition of the Star Wars theme was written and composed by Sean Flynn and was performed by the Jackie Watches Stuff house band. The Jackie Watches Stuff house band is kazoo 1, kazoo 2, bass kazoo 1, marimba halfmoon tambourine maraca and LP session shaker all performed by Shawn Flynn. Jackie Watches Stuff is available wherever fine podcasts are sold or listen online at jackiewatchesstuff.com. You can also find us on Twitter. We're @JackieWatches. See you September 18th for season two of Jackie Watches Stuff.