Jackie Watches Stuff

Jackie Watches Jaws

August 07, 2020 Jackie Vetrano / Matt Lyles Season 1 Episode 6
Jackie Watches Stuff
Jackie Watches Jaws
Chapters
Jackie Watches Stuff
Jackie Watches Jaws
Aug 07, 2020 Season 1 Episode 6
Jackie Vetrano / Matt Lyles

Jackie and Matt Lyles (@MattRLyles on Twitter and cinema blogger through COVID-19 on his blog Pandemic Flicks) are gonna need a bigger boat.

Matt wrote his own blog about Jaws! Check it out here.

Must-knows:

  • DUN DUN
  • I'll kill 'em for ten
  • Smile you sonofabitch

Here's what Jackie learned about real shark attacks: Well Said Podcast
Follow us on Twitter @JackieWatches
This episode produced by Sean Flynn (@wxgeek)

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/jackiewatchesstuff)

Show Notes Transcript

Jackie and Matt Lyles (@MattRLyles on Twitter and cinema blogger through COVID-19 on his blog Pandemic Flicks) are gonna need a bigger boat.

Matt wrote his own blog about Jaws! Check it out here.

Must-knows:

  • DUN DUN
  • I'll kill 'em for ten
  • Smile you sonofabitch

Here's what Jackie learned about real shark attacks: Well Said Podcast
Follow us on Twitter @JackieWatches
This episode produced by Sean Flynn (@wxgeek)

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/jackiewatchesstuff)

Jackie:

Hi, Matt.

Matt:

Hey, Jackie, what's going on?

Jackie:

Well, I am trying to watch a bunch of movies I've never seen. Do you want to know which one I want to watch next?

Matt:

I'm almost afraid to ask. Go ahead.

Jackie:

You should be afraid because it's about a very scary shark. It's jaws.

Matt:

No way. You've never seen Jaws? No, I have never seen jaws. I guess I also don't really have a fear of swimming in the ocean, which is a good thing. I really don't actually know what it's about. I know like okay, baseline. All I know is shark terrorizes town, like that's really all I've got. So what gave it away that it's about a shark just got it?

Jackie:

Well, I'm gonna go with literally the one movie poster that I've seen, which is like the bloody shark mouth thing?

Matt:

Yeah, so let's talk about that poster for just a second. I really want to talk about that poster because it is truly one of the most iconic movie posters of all time.

Jackie:

I would agree.

Matt:

Yes. So like, I remember when I was like first getting into movies, and I was like 10 or 11 years old, this was around the time when a lot of like the old Hollywood movies were having like their 15, 20 year anniversary. So they were releasing like these big DVD sets or in my case, I didn't have a DVD player yet. This is when DVDs were still new and I had a bunch of these like two VHS sets. I had one of Jurassic Park, I'm pretty sure I had one of like the original Planet of the Apes and I had one of Jaws. And one of the other things about these special editions, they always had like this cool new box art, new cover art, but the cover of Jaws has remained consistent since its inception. There has never been any need to change the cover of Jaws. That is such an iconic poster and a such an iconic image of the shark swimming up towards the swimming woman that is just...it tells you everything you need to know about the movie...almost.

Jackie:

Oh, well...almost Okay, well apparently I need to go watch it. So, once I watch the movie and apparently develop a fear of sharks, I will let you know and we'll talk about this iconic piece of cinema.

Matt:

I cannot wait.

Jackie:

Welcome to Jackie Watches Stuff. This is a podcast chronicling my cinematic quest to finally watch the movies I probably should have already seen. And I'm bringing my friends along with me.

Matt:

What's happening? You've seen Jaws!

Jackie:

I've seen Jaws. Like, I knew it before, but now that I've seen it it like, it just sounds a little bit different when you sing it, you know? Like, it just sounds a little different.

Matt:

Yeah. Now, I fully endorse you just referring to it as the dun dun dun dun song.

Jackie:

Yeah, I didn't know I looked it up. And it is just called like, main theme from Jaws, but I've been calling it the dun dun song which I think everybody knows, unless you're thinking that dun dun from Law and Order. Like very different dun dun.

Matt:

I mean, that's not really like a dun dun. That's more of a cun cun. Maybe? I don't know. I don't really hear a D when I when I when I think of that sound effect.

Jackie:

Oh, interesting. See, I hear it as dun dun and so now I guess I'm hopeless. I don't know. There's so many dun duns in my life now that I've seen jaws. What am I ever gonna do with myself?

Matt:

Yeah, that song, it's not used sparingly. It comes up pretty often.

Jackie:

Oh, yes. And I have a lot of thoughts on the use of music in this movie that I would like to hit as we go through the plot, but before I do that, I have to do my tradition of trying to summarize this entire movie this two hour long movie in 30 seconds. Will you time me?

Matt:

Absolutely. I've got a timer right here. So ready...

Jackie:

Oh my goodness. Okay.

Matt:

Set...go!

Jackie:

Okay, so there's a spot on an island and it's a resort and everyone comes there for the summer and it's really great because we all laid on the beach, but then this year there's this big shark attack because there's this naked girl in the water and she dies and so the chief of police is like, Oh, my God, we have to go to the beach and the mayor is like "No, we have to keep it open because I don't care about death. I just care about money." Muhahaha and they didn't care. So, the chief freaks out because he's like, no, there's really some shark attacks and some other people die and I think a dog dies. We're not quite sure. And then they keep trying to go find and kill the shark and then they try to kill a shark. But it's the wrong shark and they go out with a creepy guy named Whale or whatever.

Matt:

Time! Yeah, you got through the first half of the movie basically.

Jackie:

Oh, it was such a good first half of the movie though.

Matt:

Yeah, there's definitely two very distinct halves to this movie. Like the first hour is kind of, you know, them on the island dealing with, you know, the greedy mayor and everything and then the last hour is kind of almost like the swashbuckling part of the movie.

Jackie:

Yes, that's what I was gonna say is it's like the second half of it is an action adventure movie and the first part is just kind of like a, I don't want to say a drama. That gives it a little too much credit, but it's certainly not quite the same vibe.

Matt:

Well, I mean, I think we could give this movie all the credit in the world because of how influential it was and it created the modern blockbuster we, you know, all the blockbusters that you've enjoyed in your life would pretty much not have happened without this movie. Like, this movie created created the summer blockbuster. Star Wars kind of came along and cemented it a few years later.

Jackie:

I will definitely admit that when I was like hitting play, I...and i know why. I thought I was getting into like Sharknado. Like, I was prepping myself for like cheesy animatronics, like cheesy blood effects and I think it's because all of the other shark movies I've watched have been really really bad like, oh no, the sharks attacking! Run away! But this was like, you know pretty believable. And I mean, to put myself back in like the 1975 mindset of watching like a monster giant shark on TV or on the movie screen, attack these poor innocent vacationers. Like, that is pretty scary.

Matt:

Yeah. And you know, Jaws is definitely, you know, mostly responsible for those, you know, bad shark movies you've watched. Even like in the immediate aftermath of this movie's release, there were a lot of copycats that came out. Mostly, you know, pretty much all of them involving, you know, some animal attacking tourists somewhere. Like, there was one there was about a grizzly bear. I think it was just called "Grizzly," but I can't quite remember. The two most famous ones were probably "Pirana," which you may have heard of. And there was another one called "Orca," where they were hunting like a gigantic whale. It actually starred, if I recall correctly, it starred Richard Harris, the first guy to play Dumbledore in the Harry Potter movies.

Jackie:

Oh, now I need to go back and watch that.

Matt:

I've never actually seen it, but yeah, that would be a fun one to watch for sure.

Jackie:

We'll add it to the list then. Clearly it's not well known if you haven't seen it. Like that's of my cavalry. Li e, has Matt watched it? Okay, then it's worth my time.

Matt:

I'm aware of its existence.

Jackie:

Okay, well, more killer sea animals, I guess is the next season. All killer sea animals.

Matt:

Oh, man. I gotta do all of them, man. Like, I mean, you have to put Sharknado on the list for that too. Definitely. Definitely.

Jackie:

Goodness. All right, well, let's get into this movie. It does start with the dun dun song, but then then we cut over and there's like teens being teens on the beach, which truly I wasn't quite expecting. I thought I was gonna see a shark attack off the top. We see lots of 70s hairstyles and clothing choices. Very solid to watch in the 2020s. And it starts with, I don't want to say iconic, but like, it definitely sets the tone of the movie when we see this like drunk dude following this like kind of drunk pretty girl running into the water, gonna go skinny dipping and then we see her get attacked by a shark. It happens so fast. It happens so fast.

Matt:

The underwater shots are incredible.

Jackie:

It's crazy. I mean, I knew that scene or not even the

Matt:

Yeah, I remember my first time seeing this movie. I think scene, but just like the legs swimming underwater. I think I was like 10, maybe 11 years old and I was already really, everybody knows that, whether they've seen Jaws or not, but you know, off the top. It's like, here we go. Killer shark. you know, interested in Steven Spielberg. I'd gotten into watching movies, I'd seen a bunch of his movies and so there was a book in my grade school library that I checked out probably half a dozen times and read through as many times and they describe the opening scene in that book so I thought I was ready for it when I first watched this movie, but I kind of assumed she would just get like pulled out under and it would just be that would be it. I was not quite prepared for her to be like jerked around violently screaming it hurts. It hurts for a solid minute.

Jackie:

Yeah. And I found out how they actually did that because I thought that was her like kind of just pushing her like pulling herself under the water kind of thing. There were two crew members underwater that were pulling on weights that were attached to her legs and like, truly surprising her and jerking her under the water, which I feel like is not the safest way to go about shooting the scene.

Matt:

No, probably not.

Jackie:

That's also probably half the reason why she looks so terrified is because she genuinely had no idea that she was gonna get pulled under the water.

Matt:

Like none of the shooting of this movie was honestly that safe. It was the first movie ever to be shot out in the open ocean. So yes, they're playing around with tides. That's why so much of the movie got delayed. That's why it went over budget. That's why it, you know, it took way longer to shoot than they thought it would because they just kind of had no idea what they were doing. They were flying from the seat of their pants for a lot of the time.

Jackie:

Oh, my God. I mean, some of the greatest are made that way.

Matt:

They are. Yeah, I mean, like, you know, one of the great things that has always been pointed out about this movie is how you never see the shark until like halfway through. And that was kind of by by necessity. The mechanical shark that they were going to use kept malfunctioning. So, he had to create these very cool underwater shots in order to just imply the shark for a lot of it and it works way better than it would to just have the shark, you know, leap in the air and like come down on her.

Jackie:

Well yeah, I mean, truly when we see all those like iconic underwater shots of like, we see all the swimming legs, it like shows all the people like, which one is going to be the target, which one's going to be selected as like today's lunch by the great white. So, I agree that they're like much better. I read that Steven Spielberg called the mechanical shark "The Great White Turd" because it kept malfunctioning so it was a huge issue. That is too funny. Um, but yeah, this is like a crazy opening scene. It's like right off the bat, like you said, instead of her just sinking under the water and being like, what happened? It's like, she got murdered and we watch her get.

Matt:

Yeah, I remember when, like, when we see her remains on the beach later, your comment was, well, she's very dead.

Jackie:

She's very dead. Also that, that hand that's like sticking out of the sand. The dead girl is not a prop hand. It's one of the female crew members because Steven Spielberg didn't like the prop hand. He thought it looked too fake sp they actually buried this poor group member. So that was a real person. So she was not very dead. She was very alive, just looking very dead. But yeah, they find her body and we find out it's because of a shark attack. Dun dun dun. And the chief is like, I got to solve this entire problem for this small beach town, but of course we see the evil mayor. He's kind of painted as like the villain, but not as extreme and he's like, no, we're gonna keep the beaches open. We just have to.

Matt:

Yeah. You know, thank God we live in a world where, you know, our governments don't, you know, put the safety of the populace at risk for, you know, for the sake of the economy. I mean, can you imagine if we lived in that world right now? God, how awful would that be?

Jackie:

It is pretty insane. Like, I get why he wanted to keep everything open, like it doesn't like, and they make the most money when the people go in the water so we have to put people in the water. Like it just makes sense so...

Matt:

Now, in the book there was a famously excised subplot from the book where one of the reasons that he wanted to keep the beaches open was because the town is actually under mafia control and yeah. Now, I haven't read the book. This is all from like reading other pieces on it, but I believe that yeah, one of the subplots in the book is that Brody has to actually investigate his ties to the mafia and he discovers that's why he's trying to keep the beaches open. Yeah.

Jackie:

Now, I know I've never seen Jaws 2, but you gave me a little briefing on it earlier after I watched Jaws. Why isn't that the plot of Jaws 2? Like, there's another evil shark? Like, I feel like that would have been a good movie. I would've so watched that.

Matt:

I mean, would you prefer like just the mafia without the shark or could we have another shark and have the mafia?

Jackie:

Ooh, that's a great question. I think I'd want it to be mostly mafia with like subplot of shark. Like, oh, yeah, Ian, there's a killer shark again. Darn. But really it's the mafia., Maybe the mafia trained the killer shark, like at SeaWorld.

Matt:

That might have to be Jaws 5.

Jackie:

There it is. Steven Spielberg, call me. I'm free.

Matt:

Spielberg was not involved in any of the sequels. I think he washed his hands off the sequels very thoroughly.

Jackie:

Oh, that tracks. That very much tracks. Well, maybe he'll want to join me for my jaws 2.5 or Jaws 5 idea. Amblin Entertainment on the phone. Heard it here first, folks.

Sean:

No one steal that copyright

Jackie:

TM, TM, TM. Im gonna have to ask Shawn to cut that part out so that nobody steals my great plot idead. But in any case, we are back on the beac . The mayor is like "No, we'r gonna keep this place open." The Chief was feeling a litt e uneasy and then we watch like the Chief be the most popula man in town because everybody s asking him favors while he's just staring like, into the ocea waiting for another sh rk and he's definitely hau ted and of course, we see an ther shark attack. And to you point, we see another implied s ark attack because I don't thi k we see the shark.

Matt:

You kind see his fins a little bit. Like you see him go like, you know, swim. Yeah, you see the fins very briefly, but you don't see the scary shark teeth yet.

Jackie:

Yes, that is a good point. In my notes, I wrote in all caps, the dog died, more dunananananana, kid dies and there's a lot of blood and I feel like that's all you need to know about that scene.

Matt:

Yeah, there is a lot of blood in this movie for... this is rated PG in 1975. So like PG today is kind of like hey, parents, just so you know, some of the cartoon characters might fart some in this movie, and your kids will probably make some pretty crude jokes. No back in the day like PG meant "Parental Guidance" because we might scar your children for life.

Jackie:

I just can't believe it. And at this point there was no PG 13 rating so they couldn't even say like, Oh, this is probably not the best.

Matt:

A little bit of Trivia though: Steven Spielberg was famously partly responsible for the PG 13 rating.

Jackie:

Because of Jaws?

Matt:

No, because of "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom" and also "Poltergeist," which he executive produced. He did not direct "Poltergeist" or actual y there are rumors that he di and it's just credited to oby Hooper, but two movies tha he was involved with push he limits of the PG rating. I me n, honestly, Jaws would might be rated R today, I don't know if it would be pG 13. Yeah, beca se there's a lot of blood in t is mov

Jackie:

So everybody's freaking out because of all of the blood and they have this kind of like public meeting, I guess, because this town is so small, and they decide that there's going to be a $3,000 reward for anyone who kills this menacing shark, which kind of bothered me. I mean, I know, plot point that should annoy me is shark attacks, but also, it annoys me that the main plot point of this entire movie is there is one evil shark and he is the shark that we need to find and he is responsible for all of these killings if we just assume it's the same shark.

Matt:

Right so, I mean, I think the the Hooper character kind of explains that, you know, later on in the movie, how, you know, this is a shark who has you know, wandered this close to land and now knows that there is a food source here. So it's not going to go away. They can kind of safely assume it's one shark just because that's the way that sharks operate because of their territoriality.

Jackie:

That's fair. I mean, I did get to work with, this is a shameless plug that I'm sure will get cut from this podcast episode, but when I had the chance to host and produce "Well Said," the UNC storytelling podcast, I did get to speak with someone who studies sharks, and he told me all about how shark attacks work and how they're not actually that common and it's really just sharks kind of responding to the fact that like, hey, someone's in my environment and this is scary. Like, they're just trying mostly to protect themselves. It's not like a shark like actively seeking humans.

Matt:

And like Jaws is certainly responsible for more shark deaths than it is people deaths.

Jackie:

I can imagine that. I could absolutely imagine that. But yeah, so then we meet the one of the creepiest men in the world.

Matt:

Quint. Quint is just such a badass.

Jackie:

Quint, who I called Quill during my 30 second recap out of sheer flustering. Yes, he is kind of sketchy. Very typical fishermen. He does this like nail on chalkboard moment, which was...

Matt:

Famous shot. Love that shot.

Jackie:

Don't love it.

Matt:

Yeah, you cringed quite hard when that happened. I'll do it for $10,000.

Jackie:

I did. Oh, we didn't talk about how...listeners, Matt and I got to take advan age of the fact that we do live ery close to each other and we re able to socially distan e and watch this movie at the sa e time so Matt had the pleasur of watching me watch this mo ie so I'm sure he'll jump in $10,000. I'll catch him for three but I'll kill him for ith a lot of ridiculous moments hat I caused. I mean, it wasn' fun. And so he basically is like, oh, I'll go. I'll go fin him and I'll kill him. But yo have to... 10. The thing that was kind of weird about this scene is like, everyone kind of looked at him as though it was like, who is this man? And seemingly like, you all have been here a while, this dude has clearly been here a while. Like, why are we all so surprised creepy fisherman dude is ready to go kill a shark? I don't know.

Matt:

I get the impression that he's kind of a recluse. You know, he lives out...I guess I just assume he lives out in that shack they show where he's got all the shark teeth and everything hanging on the walls later on. Yeah, so there's actually a deleted scene where you would have met him earlier than this scene and you can actually see this deleted scene if you watch it on TV sometimes, where they show him going into a music store and buying like piano wire because the fish choke on it and there's a kid in there who is like playing his clarinet and he's playing "Ode to Joy" on the clarinet and Quint kind of goes over and just starts humming along "Ode to Joy" to try and mess the kid up. So this is definitely a guy who lives in the area. He is known, but he is also probably avoided by most people.

Jackie:

But I feel like if I was in that room, I'd be like, yep, go for it. Like, good luck! Sounds great. Like, I'm gonna be over here on the beach and not being hunted down by the evil shark.

Matt:

But I mean, people definitely try and earn that $3,000 that we later see.

Jackie:

Oh my god, there's like this mass...It's like, it reminds me of the scene in "Beauty and the Beast." When Gaston is rallying up the townspeople and he's like "There's a beast in the tower. We must go kill the beast!" and they're like all with their pitchforks and they're singing about it, like I wanted this a little bit to be a musical, like

this moment. Is there a "Jaws:

The Muscial?" I feel like this is another opportunity. TM, TM, TM, TM, TM. Copyright, copyright.

Matt:

Well, I think you've kind of skipped over one of the better scenes like, kind of the first people to go after the shark, the guys who like throw the meat out over the pier and then the pier just gets demolished.

Jackie:

Oh my goodness, I can't believe I forgot. I'm so sorry. Go ahead.

Matt:

No, I mean, that's basically what happens.

Jackie:

And they like basically find the shark but he almost dies. "Charlie, swim to me, Charlie!"

Sean:

Yeah, you're just like, can we go home now?

Jackie:

And it's like, yes, you can. I wonder why that stayed in?

Matt:

It's a great scene.

Jackie:

It's hilarious, but it's like, oh, yeah, I guess we did need another thrilling moment because we just watched k

Matt:

And they do reference it like right after that where they're walking and they're seeing everybody who's going out on the water he's talking about. "Yeah, old man, you know, had to go home and explain to his wife why all her cold cuts were gone."

Jackie:

Ah, yes. Because he's like "This is my wife's roast, it better be worth it." It's like, did you think the shark was gonna be like "Oh, hello, I see you dropped your roast. I brought it back to you." Like, that's not how this works, dude. It's not going to be worth it.

Matt:

I mean, I think you've just explained why we needed that scene in this movie.

Jackie:

That's fair. Man, Spielberg should have hired me, that is for sure. But in any case, then we meet Matt Hooper, the researcher from the Oceanographic Institute, and he's like, I'm here. I'm gonna save the day. I know every single thing about sharks, and it's seemingly nobody likes him. Nobody. And I don't know if it's because people know it's like, you're not an Islander, because there is a moment where they talk about like "Oh, are you an Islander?" "Oh, no, I'm not. I'm from New York." Like, I think there's this weird like, oh, you're not one of us.

Matt:

Yeah. And he's, well, he's kind of also walking around kind of just being a smartass.

Jackie:

Yes.

Matt:

But he's also right about everything.

Jackie:

But also, nobody listens. Like, yeah, but we could just go try to kill it? And he's like "Yeah, but also, that's really hard."

Matt:

Yeah, some of the best lines in the movie are his. We're like, we're in this scene where he's going "They're all gonna die."

Jackie:

That is true. It's the mass horde of men just trying to go earn $3,000 into the river, or into the ocean rather, not the river. So, we watched them go out in this horde after Matt shows up and apparently they find the shark. It's like a 13 foot tiger shark. Matt, the researcher, is skeptical at best and he's like "fuck this noise." He's like trying to push through the excited crowd as he's like, with his little tiny tape measure trying to measure the width of the bite and the jaw. And I found out that that shark that they caught is not actually from the Martha's Vineyard area where they shot jaws because they couldn't find a shark that was big enough to suit the scene so they had to fly a shark up from Florida, to make it into this scene so this was an imported shark and it was also decomposing the entire time.

Matt:

I mean, there are not yet gigantic sharks like that roaming in here that...

Jackie:

Well, I truly thought that that shark was fake and it makes me kind of sad to hear that it's an actual shark that they were like, well, we can't recreate one. That sounds silly. Let's just get one from Florida.

Matt:

Yeah, Idid not know that that shark was fit with that shark was real. I kind of assumed it was fake.

Jackie:

Oh, it's a real shark and it is really in the process of decomposing, which it didn't look like it. Gotta say that guy, for being a dead shark, looks pretty good.

Matt:

Yeah, it's supposed to be freshly caught, but of course, as we later find out, the bite radius is all wrong.

Jackie:

Absolutely. It is all wrong. We have like the scene of excitement, we're taking pictures. I'm going to bring up a super small scene because it is relevant to today: The scene where the mother of the child who died in the ocean comes up and looks for chief Brody and slaps him across the face, I found out her name is Lee Fierro. She actually passed away April of this year from COVID-19, which is very sad.

Matt:

She did. Yes, I remember seeing that article on the AV club. She was apparently an acting teacher out on Martha's Vineyard and that's how she got the...playing this role.

Jackie:

Which is not surprising to me, but also like very, very cool that it was like local talent, for lack of a better

Matt:

Yeah, all the actors apparently were local talent. I phrase. read another I read another article from like, a few years ago where like, the guy who pla ed the the kid who got kil ed actually reunited with her Like she just kind of randomly came into the restaurant he ow ed or something like that.

Jackie:

Yes, and there's like a sandwich on his menu named after his character who died, which I think is like super morbid if you didn't know that the actor who played that kid was the owner of the restaurant. So anyway, moving on to the movie about death. We cut over to Matt Hooper showing up to Chief Brody's house, like dressed to the nines for some reason, not quite sure why we're wearing a suit and tie, but he shows up with wine and he's like "Hey, I'm here. Let's talk about everybody that died" like, real fun. And so basically he tries to convince chief Brody like "Hey, this is not the shark. Let's go cut him open and just see what's in his stomach." Like that's normal dinner conversation and meanwhile Chief Body's wife is like "So you do shark things? Tell me about all the shark things you do." So, they actually go and try to cut this shark up like, at night after dinner. They're like "Well, we better do this right now." So we watch him like cut up the shark. Now I could not confirm if this shark we see in the scene that he is cutting open is also said decomposing shark from Florida. I'm going to assume the answer is no, but like, who knows at this point and so we see him pulling out like these disgusting like, heads of fish, a license plate, like tin cans...

Matt:

I would very much like to believe that that shark was, now that I know that the first shark was real, I'd very much like to believe that that shark is real and they just decide alright, we're gonna cut him open and we're just gonna film it. Just improvise based on what you find on a stomach.

Jackie:

Oh, my god, that would be torture. But also....

Matt:

That would be a great story.

Jackie:

Really stellar. I guess we'll have to try to dig deep.

Matt:

And Richard Dreyfus just finds a license plate in the shark stomach. It's just like, oh, well.

Jackie:

Yep. And I mean, that's the thing, too. I forgot quite where, actually where we're supposed to be in this movie, but he pulls out that plate from Louisiana and so it's like, the shark kind of had traveled apparently or it's like, or there was a car that was from Louisiana that was in the area, but whatever. It's fine. We can't ask the shark. He's dead. So we decide oh, no, it's not the shark so what are we going to do? The Chief is semi drunk, tells Matt "I've never been on a boat. I don't like boats. I don't like water." Which this is like a thing that we drive home the whole time. Like, his wife reminds us of it, he reminds us of it multiple times. He's like "I don't like water. I don't like boats. I don't. I don't like those things." It's like, well, this is your life. Like, this is where you live now so okay.

Matt:

That's a very Spielberg thing is to , for the main characters to have like fears that they overcome, like very specific fears too like, you know, Indiana Jones and his fear of snakes is another big example of Spielberg doing this or like Robin Williams in "Hook" playing Peter Pan. You know, he plays a Peter Pan who was afraid of heights?

Jackie:

Oh, that's a good point. It's just a weird...I don't think it added anything to the storyline personally, like, if he was like, I love swimming, I'm Michael Phelps, I don't think it would have made this story any different.

Matt:

No, probably not. It's It's It's definitely referenced heavily. And it's referenced in the final line, of course of the movie, but it doesn't impact the plot terribly. No, you're right.

Jackie:

But in any case, even though he is super not down to go on a boat or go in water, he is kind of drunk and Matt gets him on a small, tiny boat in the middle of the night because they decide they're going to go try to hunt the shark, I guess. Like, the motive here was not very clear to me because they're on this dinky little boat, it's very late and the Chief is drunk so like, Ah, what are we gonna do here, boys?

Matt:

But I mean, I think we're showing Hooper's overconfidence just a little bit here. I mean, you know, he's always the smartest guy in the room. He probably thinks he can handle it. And but then, of course, they drive out there and he's like "Oh, there's another boat that thought they could handle said shark and it's underwater. And the crew is also very dead."

Jackie:

Yep. And they go and investigate and we see this terrifying zombie thing fly out of one of the holes on the side of the boat and it was not fun. Did not like.

Matt:

I know. That was not fun for you at all.

Jackie:

Oh, my goodness.

Matt:

It was also not fun for my uncle. My dad told me the story of when he saw this movie in the theater. He went with my uncle and at that scene, my uncle got so scared that he threw his hands up in fear and like ripped the armrest right off the chair he was sitting in.

Jackie:

I would have done the same thing. It was like, uh! No, and I mean, I wasn't even watching this movie on like, a giant movie screen. I was just watching this on a regular old television and I was like, not down. And that had looked, of all the fake limbs that we saw in this movie, that was like the most fake, but it's so freaked me out.

Matt:

great. It's a great suspense moment.

Jackie:

So awful. So then he finally is like "Alright, we should probably head back. I don't think we can handle this." Awesome. So, of course we watch Matt, like you said smartest guy in the room, go up to the mayor and flip a shit on him, freaking out saying like "We have a problem. We got to get everybody off this beach, we got to close it down." I think we've already missed...it just came back to me the scene where Chief Brody like goes into a convenience store and like gets his own paint and signs and like...

Matt:

That's the very beginning. That's when they found the body of the first girl who got killed.

Jackie:

Yes. Okay, so we've already had the hysteria once over and now it's gonna happen again.

Matt:

And of course, Hoover is 100% right.

Jackie:

Yes, but the economy, Matt.

Matt:

The economy. That's right,

Jackie:

We need to keep the beach open.

Matt:

At least one more person needs to die for this economy. Otherwise, it won't be satisfied.

Jackie:

Well, more importantly, this weekend is the Fourth of July. We need to keep the beaches open. It's our highest day of the year. It makes us the most money. We have the most visitors and we see kind of like the visitors all coming in so like, really there is no chance that this beach is gonna get closed down, but then like, even though, presumably a lot of the people that we see on the beach in the next scene, like everybody's here, it's Fourth of July, everybody's in red, white and blue. There's tons of families on the beach, but nobody's in the water so presumably word has already spread to like, not only the people that were around for the first few shark attacks, but now to all these vacationers like, hey, there's been shark attacks. It's not the most safe thing to go in the water.

Matt:

And there's also definetly a massive police presence, you know, around. Yeah, you know, they're all out there on the, you know, on the boats, you know, clearly something is off, even if you don't know that there was a shark that killed 2+ people in this area in the past week.

Jackie:

Absolutely.

Matt:

You know, something does not feel right,

Jackie:

Right. It's like, what's going on? Like, you're waiting for something to happen. But we get a lot, we had talked about this while we were watching the movie that, these scenes, a lot of nothing is happening. Like, we're seeing a couple families chatting, we're seeing a kid make a sandcastle, you know, we're seeing somebody put suntan lotion on. There's not a lot of things happening and I think it's why you and I right now are talking through this plot so quickly is because there aren't too many plot points, even though I could not get through them in 30 seconds. Like, Spielberg just chooses to fill a lot of time with, I don't want to say nothing, because I just said that. But like...

Matt:

Yeah, I mean, to say there's nothing, I think there's actually quite a bit of activity going on, like especially like the Brody's first scene on the beach, you know, for the second attack, you know, there's constantly people walking in front of him obscuring his vision, you know. He's trying to, you know, look out and see if anything is happening and, you know, there's the one scene where he sees the the girl start to thrash around and then all of a sudden he realized that was just her boyfriend or whatever, who's, you know, gotten under her. So, he's filling it actually, it's not a lot of, you know, scary activity, but it's a lot of pretty normal activity and it's kind of just setting the stage for: This as a normal day at the beach that's about to be horribly interrupted.

Jackie:

Right. But you're also, and I don't know about you, but I definitely felt on edge because I'm the audience. I know this is about a killer shark. I know the movie's not over. So like I'm waiting for it and maybe it's that same anxiety I mean, to get super deep, but like you're feeling the anxiety that Brody's feeling and Matt Hooper is feeling because they know what is coming or what could come, I mean, they don't want it to happen, obviously, but they're feeling you know, pretty confident something crazy might happen, because they have all this protection happening and they're on guard. Brody tells his son not to take the boat into the water. He wants him to go over into the pond area instead. So, it's just tense.

Matt:

Of course, you know, shit does go sideways, but there is of course a fake outs.

Jackie:

Yes! Oh my god. So that scene is so interesting to me. I need your thoughts on this. This was such an interesting scene.

Matt:

You know, you have all the underwater shots that we're kind of used to in this movie by now. They tend to, you know, indicate that danger is afoot, but conspicuously absent is the dun dun dun music.

Jackie:

Right.

Matt:

And so when you see the shark fin and then all of a sudden you realize oh, it's just a bunch of punk kids who decided to play a prank.

Jackie:

Meanwhile, I still felt like, oh my god, this is it, even though I didn't hear the dun dun music. So it's crazy going back and I mean, for someone like you who has seen this movie before, you knew it was kids. To notice something like that, my subconscious did not even say like, oh, it's okay.

Matt:

Was the dun dun music is playing in your mind as you were watching the scene?

Jackie:

It probably was. I mean, let's be real, everybody knows that song. I mean, when I say song it's two notes.

Matt:

Yeah, but then of course the song does play for real this time.

Jackie:

Yes, but not before we see, because when the kids are playing that prank, we see this like mob trampling, Black Friday back in 2005 moment. Everybody's running. We watch old people get trampled unnecessarily. I didn't need to see that. I already watched a kid die and they already implied that a dog died, like I didn't need to see a trampled old man. So we see all this crazy town, but then we, you know we have this young girl screaming "There's a shark in the pond!" but like barely screaming because apparently we can't scream loudly in this movie. I don't know. But there is a shark in the pond and, I'm not gonna lie, I laughed a little bit when he's like kind of rowing he's like "Hey, you kids all right over there?" and then gets totally wrecked.

Matt:

Yeah, it's headed right towards chief Brody son and, you know, poor guy who stopped to just give them some sailing advice loses a leg and presumably his life.

Jackie:

Dun dun dun. This poor man. He was just trying to be nice. Yeah, it was a kind of a funny scene. I was like "Oh, man!" You kind of saw it coming once you knew there was a shark in the pond. I don't know how you felt, but I did not think that his son was going to die. First of all, we have already seen a kid die in this movie. We did not need another kid, but then of course, we could have had a great Jaws 2 moment, Revenge of the Jaw, when Brody finally mans up and decides "I am going to go in the water. I'm going to avenge my son's death." Like we could have really seen a twist in the plot.

Matt:

I mean, he kind of still does that anyway. The fact that his son is injured and goes into shock is definitely what prompts him to grab the mayor and say "Hey, sign this thing!"

Jackie:

Yeah, he just is like "Okay, I have changed my mind. You mayor, need to sign this that we are going to hire Quint for $10,000 and he's like "Yeah, but money" and then he's like "Well, my kid was also in the water." It's like great. Also, please sign this thing. We're gonna hire him. Awesome. So then we cut to them on a boat. We get to know Quint a little bit better. He's like very sailory. He's singing his little chanties and maybe is drunk, who knows?

Matt:

I mean, he's got that apparently putrid, like homemade booze that he tries to get Brody to drink.

Jackie:

Oh my goodness. And I don't know if you've ever had someone else's like homemade everclear, but it is hard. It's real hard. So, very funny scene. I do love the subplot of these two, kind of like my way versus my way. There is no compromise. Yes, there is no compromise, like I love when they have the little uncomfortable bro down where Quint pounds of beer and crushes the cannon in his hand and then Matt chugs his small glass of water and crushes the plastic cup, like it is pretty solid.

Matt:

That is a great moment, yeah.

Jackie:

And like, you know, they come together towards the end because they sing drunk and sea tunes together.

Matt:

They have that great scene at night where they're all comparing scars.

Jackie:

Oh, my God, yes.

Matt:

And then we get the famous USS Indianapolis speech.

Jackie:

Yes. Talk to me about the speech. I have a fun fact, but I think you have a fun fact too.

Matt:

Yeah. So, Robert Shaw helped write that speech and it is a true story. That actually happened and that story was actually the basis for a another movie that was released a few years ago, starring Nicolas Cage, the one and only. It is

called USS Indianapolis:

Men of Courage. I have not seen it, but it has been featured on a few bad movie podcasts that I listened to so it's probably not great. But I mean, that might be a great project to watch that movie.

Jackie:

I love all things, bad movies, and I mean, Nicolas Cage plus bad movie, you can't go wrong.

Matt:

No, not at all.

Jackie:

I mean, I guess you can go wrong because it's Nicolas Cage and a bad movie. But that is very curious because we were talking about this as we were watching it. We weren't sure if it was scripted or not. Turns out it was, which is very, very cool. I found out, and this is something I was thinking about. I'm like, man, he plays a very solid drunk man. Like, I feel like playing like acting drunk is really hard because acting drunk, you just kind of look dumb versus actually being drunk. So I kind of had a sneaking suspicion that he maybe had a little help with this little piece, you know, if you catch my drift. It turns out he tried that, Shaw asked if he could have a drink or if he could drink before the scene and they said "Yeah, sure," he got so incredibly wasted that he couldn't get through his lines and so they had to reshoot the next day. So that's, we went a little, I was about to say overboard, but I'll use it. Went a little overboard there and so he had to actually reshoot the scene, but it obviously came out very, very good.

Matt:

This is definitely a movie where almost anything that could go wrong did go wrong. They had the malfunctioning shark, which was kind of the star of the movie. They had to deal with all the tides that were making shooting difficult and one of the stars in the movie was also completely shitfaced.

Jackie:

Yes, I think it really is almost the true story of hunting down a shark. So speaking of almost true story, I found out too that the ship that they're on, The Orca, actually sank for real during filming. Not like during the actual sinking scene, but like during filming, the ship started to sink and they actually ended up damaging a ton of the footage that they had shot that day, but they rushed it to like, the movie hospital basically in New York and they ended up saving it. So like, talk about, like you said real life like, everything that can go wrong will go wrong. Like, they almost lost a whole day's worth of shooting because they sank their boat. So, I don't know how this movie did so well considering all of these signs of doom, but here we are. Sometimes it's just meant to be. I guess so. I mean, it's lasted this long. Oh my goodness. So anyway, they're on the boat. They do all these crazy things. As Quint has his like reel hooked up to the side of the boat and it starts clicking, and now we've got some tension building because "Oh my god, we caught the shark." The shark goes under the boat, it goes next to the boat, the line snaps like, there's all these almost moments from kind of this point forward that kind of lead towards the end of the movie. So, we first have this one where we almost get the shark, but then the line snaps. Then they shoot him with a harpoon and they have the barrel that is supposed to kind of keep him afloat and prevent him from diving, but he slips away from that. He comes back. Like, we see this kind of back and forth of like, when is he actually going to get the shark? Is he going to actually get the shark? We also have the "We're gonna need a bigger boat" line, which I learned is from this movie.

Matt:

Okay, that was the best part of this viewing experience for me, was you having the realization "Oh, this is the you're gonna need a bigger boat movie!"

Jackie:

Yes, I kind of had a feeling this was the movie for that line. I was just unsure like, what was going to be happening around it? I thought maybe the shark was gonna like, jump up Free Willie style and we'd be like "Oh my God, we need a bigger boat" and I was close.

Matt:

It was a much better moment than that. Much better moment than that.

Jackie:

It is much better.

Matt:

That was a very satisfying moment for me. Hopefully you're gonna need a bigger boat movie.

Jackie:

I am so glad that I could bring you joy. I did find out that that, now iconic line, was actually ad libbed. That was not in the script. And I guess during screen tests, the audience were like freaking out because they see this giant shark so all of the screams of the audience drowned out this line and so Spielberg went back, and like re edited that piece so that you could actually hear "We're gonna need a bigger boat."

Matt:

And an immortal moment was born. It is like a work of just understated genius that line.

Jackie:

I mean, it just has so many meanings within so many different contexts, generally.

Matt:

It's kind of like their "Houston, we have a problem."

Jackie:

Yes, that is a great point. And again, another iconic line that I will use for the rest of my life. But this was a part I actually wrote a note to myself as we're seeing kind of this back and forth between, basically the rest of this movie kind of goes dramatic shark scene, bro scene/character development, dramatic shark scene bro scene/slash character development. So in this whole piece though, I would say almost second half of the movie, maybe the last third of the movie, the music is like adventury. It's like, we're gonna go get the shark. It's not this tense, oh my gosh, we are up against this man eating machine that is this unkown in the water.

Matt:

Very swashbuckly. And I mean, Quint is kind of a pirat character as well. I mean, o e of the big influences on this

Jackie:

Yeah, you definitely feel that. movie that Spielberg has talk d about is it's highly influenc d by Hitchcock. But I think you can also see, you know, in this ast half of the movie, you ca definitely see like the old a venture serials creeping and hat of course, he would later ad pt and, you know, use as insp ration for the Indiana Jones mov

Matt:

Mhm. For sure. es.

Jackie:

Yeah, so it's very like, we're The Three Musketeers. We're gonna go find this shark and there's points of drama, but we're gonna avail, but they kind of don't. There's an attack on the boat and then, this is like, again, another attack on the boat. At this point we have, I believe, one barrel, maybe two, in the shark at this point. It's hard to keep track in my notes because it keeps going back and forth between happy moments and scary moments. But the shark starts attacking the boat. It kind of starts to fill up with water a little bit like, now we have lots of threats because, not only do we have the threat of the shark that we cannot kill for some reason, now our boat is sinking, but instead we're gonna drink and get super wasted and sing songs, but it's fine. We have priorities.

Matt:

I do think the boat does not start sinking until after that scene. I think it starts sinking like on the next day.

Jackie:

That's what I was confused about because the shark attacks the boat and we see kind of some cracking and some water coming in and I'm like, wait, doesn't this mean the boat's sinking, but apparently we were still good for a while?

Matt:

Yeah, there is a moment where he goes "We're gonna sink, aren't we?"

Jackie:

And it's like, well, yeah.yeah.

Matt:

I can't quite remember when that comes in, but yeah. And so yeah, the boat is sinking so what's the only thing they can do at this point? Get the shark cage out.

Jackie:

Get wasted. Oh, nevermind.

Matt:

I was gonna say get the shark cage out.

Jackie:

Priorities. Also, get wasted. They do that, yes. So at this point, when they get the shark cage out, they get wasted, they share their scar stories. Matt Hooper has this really stupid line where he's like "She broke my heart." And I'm like that's (inaudible). Um, so t en we've got more like, dun dun usic. I just keep I'm lookin at my notes now and I just keep seeing dun dun music, dun dun m sic, dun dun music. And so clear y we are in the dramatic art of this adventure movi that we're watching. This is ac ually where the shark starts f llowing the boat. They are tr ing to kind of lure the shark ack to shallow waters.

Matt:

They're trying to drown it I believe, as they say. They're trying to get it close enough that it's going to beach itself basically.

Jackie:

Yeah, soo they're like, trying to outpace this great white shark and clearly that's not going to work, right? Like they burn out the boat. You kind of have a moment and I literally just watched Titanic so I'm feeling a very similar vibe of like, we need to make this boat go faster and it's like, no, we can't push it that hard. It will break and sink and it's like, no, we have to. It was like a very similar moment for me. And so they burn out the boat, unsurprisingly. And I wrote in my notes, because right before this, we have Brody trying to call the Coast Guard because he's like "Fuck this. I'm out." This shark has barrels in it and it's still not going down. We ought to call the Coast Guard and Quint just is like, nope, and smashes this thing. Now granted, we have gone hours almost, maybe days, day, without communication, seemingly because he broke the communicator and nobody has come out looking for them presumably? Like, we're cool. Like, we're just like eh.

Matt:

So I think that he destroys the the radio and I think that's on the same day that Hooper goes down in the cage.

Jackie:

Oh, okay.

Matt:

I believe that's just hours before that happens.

Jackie:

Okay, now I'll (inaudible).

Matt:

I think that's one of the inciting incidents that leads them to deciding that Hooper needs to go down in the cage.

Jackie:

Yes, absolutely.

Matt:

Because they're dead in the water, they have no communication, they have no way to get out so the only way they're going to survive this is if Hooper can go down and kill the shark himself.

Jackie:

Absolutely. And so he goes into his shark cage and of course, I googled "How did they shoot the shark scene in Jaws?" Because this is...

Matt:

Oh, that one shark scene.

Jackie:

Just the one. There was only one in this movie. Because this is 1975 and admittedly, as many can probably suppose, I don't have a ton of knowledge of technology and movies at this time, because I don't have the cultural reference around it and so it was a little like, shooting this movie in 2020, there's effects, there's green screens, you know, there's everything you could want to shoot a scene like this and not have to even put a person underwater, let alone put them near a shark. They shot, you know, Aquaman where basically the whole movie is underwater and I don't think they went underwater once, which is just kind of rip off. Yeah. I mean, yeah, also, I mean, if you're in the water, you just get a little wet. Go in with ike a small cable. Anyway, we'l talk about that on the A uaman episode of the show. So,

Matt:

I did not know that found out that they flew out t Australia to shoot some like, -roll of actual sharks to weave nto the scene. Why Australia? Couldn't tell you. I don't know why we had to go all the way there. There are sharks everywhere, but they decided to go to Australia and they ecided to shoot like sharks wimming around so that they ould get B-roll of kind of a mo e authentic looking shark sw mming and looking menacing in tead of like an animatronic sh rk being pushed in the water k nd of thing. And they actuall brought a cage out and they di put an actor in it, but, this i what I think cracks me up the m st, they're like "Oh, we need to make these sharks in Australi look bigger so let's hire a four foot nine horse jockey, stick him in a smaller cage s a stunt double and just make eople think that the shark is bi ger because everything else is smaller."

Jackie:

And I kind of felt this vibe like when I was watching this scene I'm like "That doesn't look like him. His face doesn't look the same." I'm like "Well, you've seen him with glasses" so I just kind of let it go, but now it's like, oh, that was so not even close to being him. Like it was...

Matt:

The face is mostly obscured by the scuba gear.

Jackie:

And I think that's why they were banking on it. So that is, I think, hilarious. And then, when they were doing these days in Australia to shoot all these scenes, they were trying to get the shark to attack the cage, obviously, because they wanted some B-roll of a true shark attacking an actual cage and they were trying to course it with bait, but these sharks were super apathetic, I guess, and they just would not actually take this bait. So, haha.

Matt:

At that point I wonder if the crew just goes "Man, the premise of this movie is flawed."

Jackie:

They call Steven Spielberg and be like "Hey, man. I don't think sharks are gonna attack people. Like, what? So they were just super apathetic. Maybe things are different in Australia? They're just like chillin with the dingoes and stuff. But the scene where the shark is kind of stuck and like riving, that you see in the movie, that is actually a real shark and they did not intentionally show the shark within the cables. Apparently, during this part where they're trying to get the bait in the cage to get them to attack the cage, a shark just swam on, like over the top of the cage, but got itself stuck a little bit and just like flipped to shit. And so they were like "Oh, we just got to take this." But the problem was, the stunt double was not in the cage when that happened and so, I learned, this is like the coolest fact I've ever learned about any movie so far on the show. They actually rewrote the script because Matt was supposed to die in this scene, but they're like "Well, wait, we really like this one piece of footage we have. Let's just write it so that Matt somehow gets out of the cage and saves himself, and that's why he's not in the cage when we see this happen. So like the whole script changed because of one shark in Australia.

Matt:

That is very cool. So he does die in the book. I kind of assumed that they just wrote him to live because Richard Dreyfus is just a much more likable character. He makes him a much more likeable character than he was in the book so they just let him live because and, you know, we see Quint die later. We don't need both of them to go, but okay, that is interesting. That's really, really interesting.

Jackie:

Yeah, so like he wasn't supposed to, I mean, he was supposed to follow that plotline from the book and now Hooper's still alive, which is crazy. And so I actually took the time now knowing that to rewatch the scene and you can very much tell, like, what is the animatronic shark. Obviously any of the scenes where we see kind of like a demon shark, like coming up to the cage, you can definitely tell that it's like the fake animatronic one, but you can see some kind of Discovery Channel type shots, like of just the shark, like swimming by and that's a real shark. So go check it out. That's my really, really cool fact for this movie.

Matt:

That ranks as one of the coolest tracks, I would say.

Jackie:

So yes, Matt Hooper was actually supposed to die in the movie as well, but a shark in Australia saved him, which is very kind of cool.

Matt:

He owes that shark his life kind of honestly.

Jackie:

And they're, theyre's so gentle. But then he kind of gets lost for a little bit, but then there is like the like, you know, we're like right at the end of the movie. It's the climax of the shark attack fight scene where it's essentially just Quint and Brody still left on the boat. Matt is presumably dead.

Matt:

I mean, they think he's dead. We know he's still alive. Right. Absolutely. I was gonna say they pull up the cage and there's nothing in it and so they presume that he was eaten by a shark, which is very sad, but they kind of move on emotionally very quickly because... They were kind of forced to. The shark has officially had it with all this shit. It was playing around before, but now it's done.

Jackie:

And again, back to my earlier point about like, a shark is evil. Like, this is the plot point of all plot points. That's really annoying that it's like, this shark, I'm not a shark expert, just to put it out there, but I have to believe that a shark would not be like "These men. I'm gonna finish them off!" Like, I dont't think that's what sharks do.

Matt:

No, but I do think there's something to be said for the fact that the shark could recognize that it's being hunted and it's, you know, because it's had harpoons shot at it, you know, at least roughly half a dozen harpoons have been shot into the shark. Those things probably hurt.

Jackie:

And Matt was trying to stab it when he was in the cage.

Matt:

Right. So I think there is something to be said for the fact that the shark is aware that this gigantic floating thing is trying to kill it and now it's going to try to kill it back.

Jackie:

Right. So he's fighting instead of fighting.

Matt:

Yes. And he just kind of demolishes the boat and kind of like one fell swoop almost.

Jackie:

Yeah. So like I said, they have to emotionally move on very quickly, because they are about to die and unfortunately, Quint cannot survive because the shark attacks the back end of the boat and kind of starts to sink it and just, it was a real...

Matt:

Yeah, who was suffers a, again, a very gruesome death for what we would consider a PG movie.

Jackie:

I mean, there was blood coming out of his mouth, like, and I know that that can happen when you die, when you're hit by a shark, I guess, but like, I didn't need to see that. That was a lot going on.

Matt:

Yeah, as we've said several times in this in this episode, Quint now is very, very dead.

Jackie:

He's so dead. So, so dead, like so very dead. So many people died in this movie, in the making of this movie. I'm kidding. Nobody died.

Matt:

Fewer than you'd think though, honestly. Like, the body count is not high. It's like, I want to say the onscreen deaths are probably only four, maybe five? I'm trying to think

Jackie:

That is true. There is, like I said, the implied dog death, but...

Matt:

yeah, and then there's the dead body, there's the severed head, but we don't see that person die.

Jackie:

That is true.

Matt:

I think there's only like four onscreen deaths in this movie.

Jackie:

That's a good point. And see, that's the thing is going into this movie, knowing it was about a killer shark, I thought I was just gonna see like, left and right, people dying. Just like, I don't even know who that character is and they're dead. Like that kind of a vibe. But you're right, we really didn't see too many. So that's, I think, maybe why the tension was high the whole movie.

Matt:

Definitely.

Jackie:

Because it wasn't, I don't want to say it wasn't predictable, but it wasn't so hazard and all these things.

Matt:

No, it's a very deliberate movie.

Jackie:

Everything is delivered. I think that's a really good way to describe it. Because even going back to talking about those scenes where we see it's a normal day, all of those shots were deliberate. Like, even though there's not a lot of action happening like, oh, it's setting the scene, but also building tension at the exact same time, which is really crazy when you think about it, that you can build tension with watching a kid building a sandcastle.

Matt:

Yeah, it's masterful. Those scenes are really really masterfully done.

Jackie:

Mhm.

Matt:

Although I was wrong, so there's not just four onscreen deaths. There is one more big one that we have to get to.

Jackie:

Oh, of course. So, I was gonna say, so then we see Quint die sadly and the boat is slowly sinking and this is chief Brody's time, I guess, to like, as you mentioned earlier, overcome his fear of water and boats, even though we are well past that, my friend because we have been in a boat and it is now sinking, like the entire movie. All I wrote was: such drama in all caps, during this scene. It is just a lot of drama, a lot of like, when is he going to do it? Is he going to do it? I don't know. As the audience member I'm like, the sharks gonna die because all movies have happy endings. You know, that's what Disney

Matt:

Well, he choreographs it pretty well because, you know, you seen him shove the canister into the shark's mouth and so you're like, okay, that's definitely going to be the mechanism by which the shark dies.

Jackie:

See, here's the thing, you say it like everyone would have caught that. I did not touch that at all. So as I'm watching and we see the shark swimming and I'm like, oh, you're gonna shoot at it with this shotgun? Like lol. We just tried a million other things, like good luck, bud. And then I even see the canister in his mouth. It does not put it together for me like at all. So what I have learned by watching this movie is that I would not do well in a shark attack. Like, I would not be resourceful apparently. I would not do well. I would probably end up being Quint, truly. So, you put it together, that the canister, because there was kind of a foreshadowing where Matt Hooper is like "Dude, don't touch these canisters. They can blow up at any second!" Who remember that? Not me. Yeah, definitely Chekhov's gun right there. Yep. Yep. So he pulls out like a shotgun. And then a line that I admittedly had never heard of, but I think this is kind of a famous line, the "Smile, you son of a bitch!" line. Oh my goodness. But yeah, so there's drama, we see the ship kind of sinking. It's like now flipped on its side and he's like leaning on the, and I don't know and I know my producer Sean, who sails boats, is going to be so mad because I don't know what that thing is that sticks up from the thing and it has the sale on it and I can't remember what it's called and I know he's gonna send me a message. It's called a mast. He, like decides like, okay, I'm going to climb up the mast and he's kind of leaning on it as it's sinking. It's like, this is your last shot and he does successfully shoot the tank and it's like, yay! But then there's this moment of like, truly, now what? We have a dead giant shark that blew up into into small bits. We have shark meat all over the place. We see the ship is sinking, like, what are we gonna do and he's just out there. But then of course, who floats up to the surface? It's Matt. He's okay! Yay, he's okay!

Matt:

I love how how he just like "Quint?" He just goes "No." And they don't mourn him at all. They're kind of just like, yeah, he was kind of an asshole anyway.

Jackie:

Again, because we're men, we just shove our emotions way down deep. All the way down, all the way down. Honestly, I think I'd need to come up with another podcast, just how therapy would help so many male characters and all these movies I've been watching because like, these plotlines would be so different with therapy, like so, so much different, but I digress.

Matt:

I would personally need a ton of therapy if I just went through what they did.

Jackie:

Absolutely.

Matt:

Like they kind of show him just kind of laying there on the mast as it's sinking and I remember you kind of being just like "I mean, how is he just sitting there as like the boat sinking?" And I'm like "He's probably exhausted."

Jackie:

Probably.

Matt:

He's like, I'm gonna take a minute. I'm gonna take a minute before I swim all the way to shore. I've just killed a man eating shark. I've just blown it up in spectacular fashion. I need a minute.

Jackie:

And I mean, but again, I would not do on a shark attack. I would be panicking. Pure panic. But then Matt shows up and he's like "Hey, bud!" They suppress their emotions for Quint. They get on, like a makeshift raft out of the barrels and he says "You know, I never did like the water." And then the movie just ends and that's the end of the movie. The whole movie. It's an interesting, it's a really...

Matt:

It's a two hour movie.

Jackie:

It's a two hour movie and that is the end of it. It's just like, and that's it. You just see them kind of kicking towards the shore and then the credits roll. It was a very interesting choice for an ending, but you know what, I'm glad that I finally checked it off the list.

Matt:

Yeah, I mean, where else are you going to go after you've blown up a gigantic shark like that? I mean, what more could you put into this movie? I think like, anything else would just be superfluous and would get left on the cutting floor?

Jackie:

Absolutely. And again...

Matt:

Like, I don't think we need any scenes of them coming home, like in the "Return of the King," which went on for like half an hour. Fair. Because they don't need, like, what's going to happen? The Mayor's like, thank goodness, we can keep the beaches open. Hooray! But it just ends. So, I always tried to help folks like me who have not seen the movie and want to make it sound like they've seen the movie by kind of highlighting the things that they should know. So, I think one of them is obviously "We're gonna need a bigger boat" and the context behind that is when Chief Brody sees the shark for the first time, this killer shark and is like understanding, hey, we literally need a bigger boat. It's not a metaphor. I know. It's not used as a metaphor, but it literally is we need a bigger boat. And he says it a few more times throughout the movie, too.

Jackie:

He does do that. I mean, he definitely wants to give up many a time in this movie, which I don't blame him. And I actually I meant to bring this up, why is the police chief on this track in the first place?

Matt:

I think, well, I don't have a great answer, but I mean, I have to assume like, what else is he gonna do? He's the police chief of Amity Island. You know where they...I think they state several times how there's like no crime here. He's moved here from New York and he's like, not doing his...I mean, what else is his job but to go out and hunt sharks that have been killing the citizens of his town?

Jackie:

I guess.

Matt:

Like the shark is probably the biggest criminal they've had in this town.

Jackie:

Very like, this is like the epitome of other duties as assigned.

Matt:

Sure.

Jackie:

Like go on a boat and go find a killer shark in this tiny, tiny boat with this creepy fisherman. So that is a key No, they're very well done. point that you should take away from Jaws. Obviously the score, I think it goes without saying that dun dun dun dun song, but mean, otherwise, you really go to see it for yourself. Like, I can't even accuratel portray the death scenes t at are actually like, not as h key as I thought they were goin to be. I mean, really, if you want a really kind of niche moment to make it really sound like you've seen this movie, run your nails down a chalkboard, and then say "I'll kill it for 10." And I'm like "Oh, you definitely saw Jaws.

Matt:

Or watch SpongeBob SquarePants.

Jackie:

That's also true.

Matt:

Yeah, there is a reference to...I can't quite remember the context, but there was definitely an episode of SpongeBob SquarePants where they referenced that scene.

Jackie:

I was gonna say, now I'm just really excited to kind of see it in the wild because I know that this movie has been referenced kind of more subtly than like shark attack in the water in so many other places so I am very excited to check that out.

Matt:

And now you know anytime you hear "You're gonna need a bigger boat," you will think Jaws

Jackie:

And that I literally need a bigger boat. And if anyone says "Smile, you son of a bitch," I'm gonna know tha they're not calling me a son o a bitch. In fact, they're just telling me my face will explo

Matt:

Yeah, yeah.

Jackie:

Well...

Matt:

That would be a great catchphrase if you were like, you know, a family portrait photographer. If there's a kid who's just like not sitting still just like "Smile, you son of a bitch!"

Jackie:

That's it. Chief Brody's Photography School.

Matt:

He evidently retires from being the chief of police on Amity Island

Jackie:

Thats...Well, no. And then he sets up just like a photo booth on Amity Island called "Smile, you son of a bitch!"

Matt:

I love it.

Jackie:

Jaws 3. You heard it here first.

Matt:

There has already been a Jaws 3. Jaws 5.

Jackie:

We're at like Jaws 8 at this point. One of them is a musical. Who know? Who knows? Oh my goodness, Well, I think it definetly lived up to the hype. Thank you for taking me on this ridiculous adventure to Amity Island in the depths of the ocean.

Matt:

I am so glad I got to be there for your first time watching this movie.

Jackie:

Thank you so much for joining Matt and I on this crazy ride. In the shownotes we actually have a link to Matt's blog reviewing Jaws so definitely go check it out.

Matt:

It's more of a retrospective than review. I don't think, you know, the reviews are in. It's a good movie.

Jackie:

Awesome. Well, I'm super excited. Definitely listeners, go check it out. And I am very excited for next week because we will be watching Pulp Fiction so see you then.

Sean:

Jackie Watches Stuff is supported by our listeners. I'd like to thank our supporters in the academy on Patreon for their generous, ongoing support of the show. Thanks to Paul H. and Brianna S. and Jared S., Thomas S. and Linda V. and Missy V. Thanks again. If you'd like to join the academy and get a shout out for supporting us, visit patreon.com/jackiewatchesstuff. You can also support the show by submitting a review on iTunes or sharing us with your family and friends. Jackie Watches Stuff is hosted by Jackie Vetrano and produced by me, Sean Flynn. You can find me on Twitter @wxgeek. Jackie Watches Stuff is available wherever fine podcasts are sold, or listen online at jackiewatchesstuff.com. Send us your thoughts on "Jaws" on Twitter or @JackieWatches. Thanks for listening. Join us next time when Jackie watches "Pulp Fiction."